Why You Should Always Take Risks With ‘Bizarre’ Foreign Food

first_img The Best Drinks to Pair With Your Favorite Food Shows Editors’ Recommendations Hops and Terroir: Why the Beer World is Embracing the Wine Term It’s easy for those of us in the First World to view foreign and developing countries as intimidating, bizarre, even dangerous. This is especially true when we haven’t actually visited said countries. There’s a reason why those eager to step outside their comfort zone often look to travel as a way to escape the ordinary. Every day brings new people, new places, and new experiences. So, why not new food?Food is the connective tissue that runs through every culture on earth. I’m not the first person to recognize that eating what the locals eat (ideally with the locals) is the best way to dive head-first into a foreign culture. To know what they farm, what spices they use, and what utensils they eat with provides keen insight into every destination. It’s also the fastest way to endear yourself to locals. Eating their food is an implicit sign of respect. Even if you don’t like the food, at least you’re doing your part to attempt an appreciation of it.Posts claiming to rank the world’s most “bizarre” or “dangerous” foods pepper the internet. These provide good fodder for armchair travelers and, in the digital age, for bolstering one’s social media shares. But, they also paint a skewed, simplistic picture because the word “bizarre” is relative. For foreigners looking in on Americans, for example, our fast food is often considered bizarre. Some of our most popular supermarket staples are oddities as well. For one, most people outside of the United States don’t understand our fixation on peanut butter. Even our beloved Hershey’s chocolate, breakfast cereals, and plain white bread are considered unpalatable by many outside the country.Anthony Bourdain’s massive popularity is due in large part to his badass, devil-may-care travel style. He’s notorious for eating just about anything. There’s an undeniable voyeurism in watching him suck down raw seal eyeballs and all manner of testicles. Most of us think: “Dude’s crazy! I’d never do that!” But you can, and, if you’re so inclined, you should. Travel adventures needn’t only be about bungee-jumping in Australia or taking a gondola ride in Venice. There are culinary adventures around the corner at every restaurant, pub, cafe, or street food cart if you’ve never eaten there before.To be sure, it’s rarely ever a good idea to throw all caution to the wind. Keep your wits about you, but take calculated risks. If, for example, that Thai chicken from the street vendor doesn’t smell quite right; if there are zero locals at a nearby cafe during the height of the lunch rush; if the guy preparing your ramen bowl is sniffling into your noodles — these are all good signs that it’s best to dine elsewhere. However, the most rewarding and downright fun sort of travel — the kind that gives you a good story to tell later — is full of taking chances. If you simply hate seafood, a foreign sushi joint probably isn’t for you. But, if you genuinely love sushi, don’t avoid that plate of san-nakji (a Korean delicacy of octopus sliced, diced, and served almost alive) just because it seems weird or it might be gross.I’ve eaten escamoles (ant egg) tacos in Puebla, Mexico; gnawed on whole goat cooked in the sands of the Jordanian desert; and sampled still unidentified bushmeat in South Africa. You should too. In the 10 years since I began traveling almost full-time, I’ve had only one severe case of food poisoning. This is anecdotal, of course. Your mileage may vary. But, at least I know I’m in good company. In a 2016 interview with Newsweek, Bourdain shared his simple secret for not getting sick on the road:“In my 15 years in traveling around the world, I’ve missed three days due to stomach problems. I eat what locals eat. I’ve long found that the person on our crew most likely to get sick is the one who is sort of wary of street food and local food. They always get sick from eating the breakfast buffet at the hotel. That’s what brings people down. You eat in crowded local joints, and chances are you’re going to be okay.”Bottom line: Eat like a local, not like a tourist. How 2 Brooklynites are Reviving an Iconic Midwestern Supper Club Hillrock Estate Distillery Is Making Some of the Best Whiskey in America Sip On the Original Stormtrooper Beer While You Wait for the Next Star Wars Movie last_img read more

Persons with a Second Language Earn More – Thwaites

first_imgMinister of Education, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, says that persons with a second language, such as Spanish, stand to earn 15 per cent more than those without such a skill. He was addressing a ‘Spanish Day’ event on Novmber 30 at Kingston Technical High School, where he encouraged students to learn a second language to enhance job prospects and earnings. “This is something that can give you an additional skill in your life, so that when you leave (school) you can earn more and you can help your family and your nation,” he stated. He cited the maritime and hotel industries as two areas where having an additional language skill is an advantage. “The tourists who are coming to Jamaica now, many of them are coming from Europe and they speak Spanish and they expect that you will understand them and be able to entertain them and to make them happy so that you can become prosperous,” he said. Minister Thwaites stressed that it was even more important for Jamaicans to learn Spanish, given the country’s proximity to the Latin American region, which is an important economic zone, and the fact that Spanish is becoming a vital language in the Americas. One of the two teachers of Spanish at the school, and Co-ordinator of the Spanish Day, Tandy Brown, told JIS News that the institution has been celebrating the day for the past three years, in an effort to engender a greater appreciation for the Spanish language among students. “We also recognise that because of our environment, many of them are not exposed to anything Hispanic. We have a lot of Spanish persons here in Jamaica but they don’t encounter them. So what we do is to try and invite as many persons from the Hispanic countries to come and share this day with us,” she said. The Argentine Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency, Ariel Fernández and Charge d’Affaires at the Panamanian Embassy,Lorenzo Chiari, participated in the day’s event. Students were exposed to various cultural tidbits from the several Spanish-speaking countries, including, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Panama, Spain, Dominican Republic and Columbia. The students participated in exciting activities such as a treasure hunt, sign language exercises, a karaoke session and a fashion show featuring the traditional dress of the Spanish-speaking countries. The event was sponsored by Digicel, Lime, GraceKennedy, Carlong Publishers and Burger King.last_img read more

Early Childhood to Get Bigger Share of Budget

first_imgEducation Minister, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, has reiterated his commitment to restructuring the education budget in an effort to ensure that there is equity across the sector, particularly as it relates to early childhood education. Speaking at a press briefing at the Ministry’s Heroes Circle offices on December 12, Mr. Thwaites said that at present, early childhood education only receives three per cent of the budget.   “The way the budget is divided, roughly 40 per cent (goes) to primary (education), 40 per cent to secondary (education), 17 per cent to tertiary and three per cent to early childhood and special education,” he informed. He noted that a restructuring of the budget is therefore essential in order to “right the injustice”, which has been meted out against the early childhood sector. According to the Education Minister, early childhood education has been treated as the “Cinderella of the education system”, pointing out that this must change for the sake of the nation’s children and teachers. He said that early childhood teachers are often poorly paid, regardless of their qualifications. “Even a qualified early childhood teacher gets lesser pay than a similarly qualified teacher in another level of the system,” he remarked. “This is patently unjust.” The Education Minister gave his commitment that going forward he would be working assiduously to “right these wrongs”.last_img read more

Minister says Govt. is Committed to the Elimination of all forms of Child Labour

first_imgBy Athaliah Reynolds-Baker, JIS Reporter Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier, says the Government is committed to the elimination of all forms of child labour in Jamaica.He informed that this objective is anchored on the recognition that the eradication of abuse against children is directly linked to the development of a safe society for all citizens.“Our determination in this goal is unshakable and we will remain engaged with the International Labour Organization (ILO), the European Union, and other international and local partners in this endeavour,” he assured.The Minister was presenting the keynote address at the World Day Against Child Labour 2013 forum, held at the Alhambra Inn in Kingston, on June 12. The day was observed under the theme: ‘No to Child Labour in Domestic Work’.Child labour, as defined by the ILO’s Minimum Age Convention of 1973, is a form of abuse, which refers to any work done by children which is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful to them and interferes with their education.Under the country’s Child Care and Protection Act, it is an offence to employ a child under 13 years old. The law, however, makes an exception for children 13 to 15 years old to be employed, but only under circumstances where they are allowed to do only light work.Minister Kellier further pledged that children in hazardous work – one of the worst forms of child labour – which either threatens to harm the health, safety, wellbeing or morals of the children involved, will not be condoned in Jamaica “in any shape, size or form”.He pointed out that in this vein, the Ministry has increased its capacity to introduce, implement and enforce new legislation for this purpose.“(Our country) programmes, among other things, seek to strengthen the capacity of national and local authorities, social partners and civil society in the formulation, implementation and enforcement of policies to fight the scourge of child labour,” he said.The Ministry, he informed, has also achieved the integration of child labour education in various relevant national plans.Mr. Kellier also pointed to the work of the Tackling child labour through education (TACKLE/ILO) project office, which he said, continues to work to increase the ability of a range of social partners to play an integral role in policy dialogue and practice in their own organisations.He said all Jamaicans also have a role to play in the fight against child labour, noting that many culturally accepted practices and perceptions must be overcome in order to eradicate the practice.Meanwhile, Chairman of the Advisory Board, TACKLE Project, Errol Miller, informed that approximately 16,000 children are involved in some form of economic activity in Jamaica.He noted that the figure is contained in a survey carried out by the Statistical Institute of Jamaica in 2002. The study revealed that the chief child labourers were street children, including market vendors, mainly in urban areas; commercial agricultural workers; urban formal sector workers, and domestic workers.“The message is apt for Jamaica – we are also guilty of child labour,” he said. Mr. Miller therefore called on all Jamaicans to say a resounding “No, to child labour!”For her part, Head of Delegation, European Union, Paola Amadei,  pointed out that the closest ally of child labour in the developing world is poverty.She noted that, as such, the EU is engaged in combating the root causes of the problem through a number of programmes, including the Poverty Reduction Programme (PRP).Ms. Amadei also informed that as a main supporter in the rural sector, the EU hopes that by improving the conditions and prospects for rural farmers, there will be a run-on effect on improving the conditions which allow child labour to fester.She noted that  the data on child labour in Jamaica is over a decade old,  and called on the Ministry of Labour to embark on research, which will provide new statistics in this area. This, she said, will assist in strengthening the government and other stakeholder efforts in fighting the problem. The ILO estimates that children make up nearly 30 per cent of the world’s estimated 50 to 100 million domestic workers.June 12 was designated World Day Against Child Labour in 2002 by the ILO, with the objective of focusing attention on the extent of child labour globally and the efforts being made to eliminate the problem.last_img read more

Students Urged to be Agents of Change

first_img Acting Chief Medical Officer in the Ministry of Health, Dr. Michael Coombs, has challenged new and returning students of the University of Technology (UTech) to become agents of change, by helping to promote good values and attitudes in the society.Dr. Coombs made the call while addressing a church service held recently at the institution’s Papine campus in St. Andrew, as part of the 2013/14 orientation programme.He stated that as the next generationof professionals, the students are “strategically placed to be agents of change under God, to recreate a nation with these desperately needed values and attitudes. I can assure you that this is the only hope for personal and national transformation.”Dr. Coombs told the students that they could not be considered to be adequately educated until they appreciate the importance of and have “acquired these values and attitudes.”He pointed to the absence of “bible-based” values and attitudes in the society, which, he said have resulted in many social problems.“We now face as a nation (where there are), poor interpersonal relationships in every sphere, a lack of respect for authority, crime and violence, and a breakdown of the building block of nations,” he said.Dr. Coombs urged the students to take a stand for the righteousness of God. “The same God we pray to in our National Anthem here in Jamaica, without this God, there can be no transformation,” he argued.He reminded the students, also, to spend quality time with God and to pray, noting that prayer was the only way to know and experience God. “The blessings that will result will be worth your while,” he stated. He pointed to the absence of “bible-based” values and attitudes in the society UTech students challenged to become agents of change Story Highlights Dr. Coombs highlighted the importance of “values and attitudes”last_img read more

Senate Passes Bill to Modernise Agricultural Sector

first_imgStory Highlights The Bill also provides for the establishment of the Agricultural Appeal Tribunal and for the registration and regulation of the agricultural loan societies by the Registrar of Co-operative Societies, and the certification of approved organisations by the Minister. A Bill seeking to modernise the agricultural sector to meet the nation’s growing demands of food security and productivity was passed in the Senate on October 6. Closing the debate in the Senate on October 6, Government Senator, Hon. Pearnel Charles Jr., said hundreds of thousands of farmers and their families will be impacted through the provision of more effective regulation and monitoring of important institutions. A Bill seeking to modernise the agricultural sector to meet the nation’s growing demands of food security and productivity was passed in the Senate on October 6.The Agricultural Loan Societies and Approved Organisations Act also facilitates the dissolution of the Agricultural Credit Board (ACB) and transfers the Board’s monitoring and regulatory functions to the Registrar of Co-operative and Friendly Societies.Closing the debate in the Senate on October 6, Government Senator, Hon. Pearnel Charles Jr., said hundreds of thousands of farmers and their families will be impacted through the provision of more effective regulation and monitoring of important institutions.He said these institutions will provide resources to the farmers, so they will be able to feed their families, the country and the world.Government Senator, Dr. Saphire Longmore, said under the Act, farmers could benefit from numerous advantages, including self-ownership and democratic control, increased farming income, improved service, quality of supplies and products, assured sources of supplies, expanded markets, improved farm management, legislative support, local leadership development and increased farmer control of agricultureShe added that all these are important to the development of the country’s agricultural society.“We are all cognisant of how beneficial developing our agricultural sector is to our country. This Bill will make it more significantly possible for Jamaicans to realise this dream of food security and agricultural productivity,” she said.The Bill also provides for the establishment of the Agricultural Appeal Tribunal and for the registration and regulation of the agricultural loan societies by the Registrar of Co-operative Societies, and the certification of approved organisations by the Minister.last_img read more

JIS Awards Students in Heritage Competition

first_img The annual JIS Heritage Competition’s essay category targets children at the primary level who are between nine and 12 years old. They are required to write between 400 and 500-word pieces on a specific theme. The Jamaica Information Service (JIS) has awarded 21 students for outstanding essays, posters and photographs submitted in the 2017 staging of the agency’s Heritage Competition, which was held under the theme ‘How would you like to see Jamaica in another 55 years?’.These students were awarded on Monday, November 27, at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge in St. Andrew, during the annual JIS Heritage Competition Awards Ceremony.Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the JIS, Mrs. Donna-Marie Rowe, congratulated the awardees and encouraged them to continue aspiring for greatness through their individual talents.“The youngsters really showed that they understand the events that impact us as a country. They also were able to articulate for us their dreams and their vision for Jamaica. They took the courage to submit the entries and we’re very happy with the quality that we received this year, and our judges said they were very pleased with the outcome,” Mrs. Rowe said.Among the 21 students, three emerged overall winners in the categories of the competition. They were Jaida Lalor from George Headley Primary School in Kingston (Essay); Akeem Plummer from Belair High School in Manchester (Poster); and Sarah-Fay Buckland, University of the West Indies, Mona (Photography).Jaida was very excited about being the winner in her category, as her sister, Jhanel Lalor, a student at Campion College, won in the same category in 2015.“I was very excited and I was happy. My inspiration was the people I see on the streets when I go to school every day, so I joined the essay competition to write about how I would want to see Jamaica in the future,” Jaida told JIS News.Unlike Jaida, who expected to win, Akeem did not expect his victory, given that he was entering the competition for the very first time.When asked by JIS News how he prepared his poster entry, he said based on the photo [and] resources that were given, “I looked at the pictures that meant the most to me, like pictures from areas such as track and field, our heritage sites, our achievements, and I composed those based on my interpretation of the theme ‘Jamaica 55’.”Unfortunately, Sarah-Fay, winner of the photo category, was absent from the awards ceremony.Gianne Willie, another student from George Headley Primary; and Janelle Ellis from Praise Tabernacle Christian Academy, placed second and third, respectively, in the essay category.Zarri-Ann Baugh from Ardenne Extension High School and Aliyah Wright from Manchester High School came second and third in the poster category.Lamar Salmon from The Mico University College and Janielle Lyn placed second and third in the photo section of the competition.The annual JIS Heritage Competition’s essay category targets children at the primary level who are between nine and 12 years old. They are required to write between 400 and 500-word pieces on a specific theme.The essays were judged based on the relevance to the topic, originality, accuracy and analysis of research data, writing style and language skills. At least one of the references should have been made to a JIS source.On the other hand, the poster competition was open to students in grades seven to 13 at a registered secondary school. They were required to design an 11×17-inch poster digitally or by illustration depicting ‘Jamaica 55’. Posters were judged on interpretation of the topic, originality, neatness and presentation.Meanwhile, the photographic competition targeted students attending an accredited tertiary institution. They were required to submit a high resolution quality photograph depicting Jamaica 55. Entries were judged based on originality, composition, technicality and impact. Story Highlights “The youngsters really showed that they understand the events that impact us as a country. They also were able to articulate for us their dreams and their vision for Jamaica. They took the courage to submit the entries and we’re very happy with the quality that we received this year, and our judges said they were very pleased with the outcome,” Mrs. Rowe said. The Jamaica Information Service (JIS) has awarded 21 students for outstanding essays, posters and photographs submitted in the 2017 staging of the agency’s Heritage Competition, which was held under the theme ‘How would you like to see Jamaica in another 55 years?’.last_img read more

Farmers Urged to Capitalise on Alex Platform

first_img Mr. Bartlett said the platform, which was set up to facilitate the purchase and exchange of goods between farmers and buyers within the hotel industry, will result in an increase in the use of local produce in tourism enterprises, and support the national thrust to reduce imports. Story Highlights Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, has urged Jamaican farmers to capitalise on the Agri-linkages Exchange (ALEX) platform, which he says will be a huge catalyst in equipping them to reap the benefits of tourism’s success.Mr. Bartlett said the platform, which was set up to facilitate the purchase and exchange of goods between farmers and buyers within the hotel industry, will result in an increase in the use of local produce in tourism enterprises, and support the national thrust to reduce imports.The Minister was speaking at the launch of the ALEX platform at the Montego Bay Convention Centre on December 13.“With the help of ALEX, we are leveraging technology to bring hoteliers in direct contact with the farmers, and in turn reduce leakages and retain more of the economic benefits of tourism in Jamaica,” Mr. Bartlett said.“When you think that about one-third of all visitor spend is on food, it makes sense to target agriculture to reduce imports and increase the use of locally grown fruits and vegetables,” he further explained.The Minister also implored farmers to seize the opportunities which abound, by providing a reliable supply of high-quality food “every day of the year” to players in the industry, as the “phenomenal growth in the tourism sector” has created a larger market for fresh produce.He said the synergy between the agriculture and tourism sectors underscores the Government’s commitment to bring all segments together to ensure responsible tourism that brings benefits to the “wider society” by deepening the linkages among agriculture, manufacturing, gastronomy, health and wellness, sports and others.Agriculture and tourism, in particular, he argued, offer the best opportunities for inclusive economic growth.“The launch of ALEX represents my Ministry’s continuing efforts to build resilience and sustainability in the industry by ensuring the economic benefits of tourism reach communities and positively impact more Jamaicans,” he said.Mr. Bartlett said the Ministry of Tourism, through the Linkages Network, will be driving several initiatives to build the capacity of local farmers in their bid to meet the needs of the hospitality and tourism sector.The initiatives include an Entrepreneurial Training and Coaching Programme, and a berry farming development project geared at preparing farmers to support hoteliers’ needs for fresh, high-quality strawberries, raspberries and blueberries.He indicated that an updated Tourism Demand Study, which will provide the empirical data to allow for the effective planning and identification of goods and services in the tourism sector, is being prepared and will be ready for release in March 2018.Mr. Bartlett expressed confidence that the Gastronomy Network, under the leadership of former Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association (JHTA) President, Nicola Madden-Greig, will achieve its set goals, as its recent initiatives, which include the launch of the Jamaica Blue Mountain Culinary Tour and the Taste of Jamaica mobile app, will help to position the country as a “first-class tourist and gastronomic destination”.“Jamaica is fortunate to be blessed with gastronomic offerings born out of the rich diversity of our heritage, which make us ideally positioned to take advantage of the growing phenomenon of culinary travel,” the Minister said. The Minister also implored farmers to seize the opportunities which abound, by providing a reliable supply of high-quality food “every day of the year” to players in the industry, as the “phenomenal growth in the tourism sector” has created a larger market for fresh produce. Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, has urged Jamaican farmers to capitalise on the Agri-linkages Exchange (ALEX) platform, which he says will be a huge catalyst in equipping them to reap the benefits of tourism’s success.last_img read more

Governor-General Lauds FosRich Company Limited

first_img Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has lauded FosRich Company Limited as a good example of corporate governance.In his keynote address at the company’s 25th anniversary dinner and awards ceremony on Sunday (May 19) at the Spanish Court Hotel in Kingston, the Governor-General commended the company’s directors and staff on the milestone achievement.“We are proud of you and all those who have stood with you on this exciting journey. We are here in the company of members of an enterprise which has set an excellent example of corporate responsibility, corporate sensitivity and profound appreciation of national need,” he said.The Governor-General argued that at 25 years, FosRich is well positioned to build on the success of the past. He encouraged the management and staff to build on the powerful foundation that is already established.“There is no stopping FosRich. They are on the go, looking ahead and going beyond. From a small beginning in a small apartment, the company has grown to become the island’s largest distributor of electrical products, energy and lighting solutions,” the Governor-General said.Expressing gratitude to his employees for their dedicated service, Managing Director, FosRich Company Limited, Cecil Foster, attributed the company’s success to identifying and supplying the needs of the local market through partnerships with reputable brands such as Phillips, Nexans and Siemens. This, he said, is complemented by exceptional service by the company’s employees.Wife of the Governor-General, Her Excellency the Most Hon. Lady Allen (left), presents a plaque to FosRich Company Limited employee, André Thomas, for his 12 years of service to the company. Occasion was the company’s 25th anniversary dinner and awards ceremony, held on Sunday (May 19) at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston. FosRich Company Limited is a major importer and distributor of electrical and lighting products. “We are proud of you and all those who have stood with you on this exciting journey. We are here in the company of members of an enterprise which has set an excellent example of corporate responsibility, corporate sensitivity and profound appreciation of national need,” he said. Story Highlights In his keynote address at the company’s 25th anniversary dinner and awards ceremony on Sunday (May 19) at the Spanish Court Hotel in Kingston, the Governor-General commended the company’s directors and staff on the milestone achievement.center_img Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has lauded FosRich Company Limited as a good example of corporate governance. “To our special customers and tremendous partners, we are committing every single day from now on to continue working with you and for you. We have achieved this milestone on the backs of some great individuals. We are going to achieve further success with your continued support,” he said.The company honoured 10 employees for serving between 10 and 19 years. Several employees also received the Chairman’s Award for exemplary performance. Customers were also recognised from the northern, southern, eastern and western regions.The company is also providing one scholarship each to the University of Technology (UTech) in Kingston and Northern Caribbean University (NCU) in Manchester. Each is valued at $500,000.FosRich Company Limited was established in 1993 with three employees. It now boasts a staff complement of 126 across seven locations in Kingston, Mandeville and Montego Bay.The company is a major importer and distributor of electrical lighting, solar water heaters, solar photovoltaic systems, light-emitting diode (LED) and induction lighting, and hardware products.It carries a range of electrical products, including panels, breakers, copper wires, energy-saving bulbs, decorative lights and ceiling fans. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC conduits) and pipes are also being manufactured in Jamaica by FosRich Limited.In 2015, FosRich introduced its hardware division, ‘Better Homes Depot’, carrying ladders, tiles, doors, bathroom fixtures, vanities, lumber, among other things.The company was listed on the junior arm of the Jamaica Stock Exchange in December 2017.last_img read more

Caterpillar Performs First Dual Fuel Engine Retrofit in Hull

first_imgzoom Caterpillar Marine has completed the commercial marine industry’s first dual fuel engine retrofit conversion in hull  onboard the Coral Anthelia, an Anthony Veder LNG carrier vessel.The MaK M 43 C diesel engine was retrofitted to the 6 cylinder M 46 dual fuel platform, with each cylinder offering 900 kW of rated power. As a result of performing the retrofit within the hull, no modifications had to be done to the ship’s structure and no docking was required, according to Caterpillar.“Caterpillar is firmly committed to providing sustainable, flexible solutions that enhance our customers operations. We’re proud of the collaborative effort between Anthony Veder, Cat dealer Bolier and our engineering team to successfully achieve a beneficial industry milestone,” said Karl Vollrath, Caterpillar Marine customer service manager. “As an LNG carrier operating in waters impacted by SECA regulations, the Coral Anthelia will be able to optimize its performance utilizing LNG, heavy fuel oil or diesel.”With a bore of 460 millimeters and stroke of 610, the M 46 dual fuel engine was designed for electric drive propulsion systems as well as mechanical propulsion systems.The M 46 DF was engineered to allow for the retrofitting of current M 43 C engines. Additionally, existing M 32 C engines can be retrofitted to the MaK M 34 DF dual fuel platform.As a result of the synergies between the two platforms, Caterpillar can perform in hull retrofit conversions without having to move the engine block or perform extensive machining. “The benefits of an in hull retrofit for our customers are incredibly significant,”Axel Hausmann Caterpillar Marine customer service managersaid. “In addition to preserving the integrity of the vessel, an in hull retrofit saves the customer time and money in an industry driven by the bottom line.”Press Release; Image: Lyselast_img read more