Wellington Sevens – the draw in full

first_imgFijiSouth AfricaFranceCanadaFeel the power of Rugby Sevens click here “It all perfectly sets up the Wellington event, which is sure to be another packed stadium with the tickets having sold out so quickly again.“The core teams have a few weeks now to go home and recharge the batteries before meeting up again and also taking on the local qualifiers from Oceania, Papua New Guinea, Tonga and Cook Islands, who are always strong.”After the Wellington tournament, the eight-event HSBC Sevens World Series will travel on to Las Vegas in the USA before also visiting Hong Kong, Australia, England and Scotland, climaxing at Murrayfield on 28-29 May 2011.Pool AEnglandWalesUnited StatesCook IslandsPool BNew ZealandArgentinaScotlandPapua New GuineaPool C SamoaAustraliaKenyaTongaPool D Sevens lineoutThe pools and match schedule have been announced for the third event of the 2010/11 HSBC Sevens World Series, on 4-5 February 2011 in Wellington, New Zealand.Once again, the NZI Sevens kicks off the World Series action in the new year and will be played at the city’s famous Westpac Stadium.After the first two events in Dubai and South Africa, England lead the World Series with 44 points from New Zealand (40), Samoa (36) and Fiji (32) with South Africa lying fifth on 24.As a result of their strong start – including winning the Cup title in Dubai and reaching the final in South Africa – England top the seeds in Wellington and start in Pool A with matches against Wales, USA and the Cook Islands.New Zealand’s title defence in George has helped them to second in the standings and they top Pool B with matches against Argentina, Scotland and Papua New Guinea.Reigning World Series champions Samoa and defending NZI Sevens champions Fiji have both reached two Cup semi finals this season and top Pools C and D respectively.Samoa face three tough matches in Pool C against Commonwealth Games silver medallists Australia, Kenya and the ever dangerous Tongans, while Fiji will take on South Africa – twice Plate winners this season – France and Canada in Pool D.“We have enjoyed a superb start to the new HSBC Sevens World Series with two different winners, many teams competitive and sell-out crowds in both Dubai and George,” said IRB Tournament Manager, Beth Coalter.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Ofisa Treviranus joins Exiles

first_imgCommenting on his decision to sign for London Irish, Ofisa said: “I have heard a lot of good things from the Samoan boys who have played for London Irish, and I’m looking forward to joining Sailosi Tagicakibau in the squad. I’m keen now to take my career to the next level by playing with the Exiles.”London Irish head coach, Toby Booth said: “I was impressed with the way Ofisa performed in the World Cup against challenging opposition. He is able to play in all three back row positions. He carries the ball like a number 8 and plays defensively as an openside flanker in the way he is hard over the ball.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Samoan back rower was also part of the nations Sevens teamLondon Irish has signed Samoan back rower Ofisa Treviranus to bolster their forward pack.The 27 year old Samoan, who has played 22 Tests for the Pacific Island nation joins the club for an initial period until February 2012 with a view to him then remaining at the club until the end of the 2014 season.Treviranus made his Test debut against Japan in 2009 and has previously been an integral part of the Samoan Sevens side that won the IRB World Series in 2010. Toby Booth spotted Ofisa’s talents during the recent Rugby World Cup where he played in three out of the four pool games for his country.center_img ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA – APRIL 03: Ofisa Treviranus of Samoa makes a break during the match between Australia and Samoa on day two of the 2011 Adelaide IRB Rugby Sevens at Adelaide Oval on April 3, 2011 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images) last_img read more

Aviva Premiership: Round 2 wrap

first_img Two for the money: A David Strettle brace helped Saracens on the way to smashing 14-man Gloucester in Round 2By Alan DymockTHE FALLING anvil has proven a more effective weapon than the skipping rope in the first two weeks of the Aviva Premiership as the sturdier forces of Saracens and Northampton Saints have landed at the top of the league, while the young adventurers of Gloucester are at the bottom of the table.Saints were this week’s Friday night draw alongside Harlequins, but in the pouring rain neither side could string together enough nice passes to make anything meaningful. George North made one promising charge down the left wing, but no one was able to take a pass and give it in the legal manner that would yield a try.Coming of age: Bath fly-half George FordHarlequins’ Nick Evans’ boot looked hungover for the second week in a row and so there were only a few penalties to bother the scoreboard. It took a James Wilson try for Northampton to decide the contest, skidding to him eventually after bounding off a Quin’s face and the ground, and that ugly number was enough to seal a 13-6 victory.Elsewhere on Friday, Falcons upset their doubters by overcoming Sale – who scored via Dan Braid – with only the boots of Phil Godman and Rory Clegg. It was a win few saw coming after Sale defeated Gloucester on day one and the squeeze from the Newcastle pack on a night where little quarter was given will have brought a smile to Dean Richards’ face. On the Saturday Exeter Chiefs and London Wasps conspired to put on five tries between them, with Exeter coming out on top 30-26. It was the second close call for Wasps in the space of a week, but it was a rallying cry by an Exeter side humbled by Saints last week. Particularly impressive was Welsh winger Tom James who twice ghosted round the visiting defence. Christian Wade showed that he is still capable of cutting a rug, too, with a try of his own and bullocking breakaway Ashley Johnson made amends for a first-half yellow card by scoring in the closing minutes, but it was too little too late.Catch me if you can: London Irish winger Marland YardeTigers were down 21-7 at the break after the young fly-half and try-scorers Jonathan Joseph and Matt Banahan had punished the visitors following Logovi’i Mulipola and Tom Youngs’ yellow cards. Tigers bit back in the second with tries from Niki Goneva, Ed Slater and Steve Mafi, but Bath had the resolve to see it out in front of 11,000 feverish fans. WORCESTER, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 14: Marland Yarde of Irish gets away from Chris Pennell and Mike Williams of Warriors to score their first try during the Aviva Premiership match between Worcester Warriors and London Irish at Sixways Stadium on September 14, 2013 in Worcester, England. (Photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Elsewhere, two tries from impressive starter Marland Yarde were enough to see London Irish bump past Worcester Warriors, 20-18.Finally, Bath pulled off a win against Leicester Tigers on Sunday that many saw coming, but the champions will be upset about the manner of their first-half performance while being impressed with the way Bath, and in particular George Ford, held on to secure the win.Saracens, on the other hand, dispatched Gloucester 44-12 on Sunday after bounding towards two David Strettle tries and one apiece for Joel Tomkins, Billy Vunipola and Schalk Brits. Fredie Burns hung in there and took four penalties but his side were always up against it once prop Nick Wood had been sent off for stamping on Jacques Burger with only a minute on the clock. With Gloucester working frantically and Owen Farrell seeing plenty of industry on his outside shoulder it was inevitable that the visitors from the South West were going to lose.last_img read more

How will England’s back row combat ‘McPooper’?

first_img By Alex ShawThe term ‘Pooper’ may have begun fading out of rugby’s lexicon following the conclusion of the Rugby World Cup last year, but it stands to return with a vengeance when England make their trip Down Under this summer.The pairing of David Pocock and Michael Hooper shone at the RWC and earned every column inch of praise that has since been lavished upon them. With both players performing well in Super Rugby thus far, they look set, barring injury, to retain their places with the Wallabies for England’s tour of Australia.However, an extra variable has been thrown into the mix, and that variable goes by the name of Sean McMahon.It wasn’t that long ago that McMahon was excelling with the Australia U20 squad and his performances at that level and with the Rebels in Super Rugby prompted his international debut back in 2014, just a few short months after he caught the world’s attention at the Junior World Championship.Born Rebel: Sean McMahon in action for the Rebels against the HurricanesHe has been a dominant force in the Rebels back row this year and his form has led to Michael Cheika dropping hints that he could field three natural opensides – Pocock, Hooper and McMahon – in his starting back row this season. Whilst this would limit the Wallabies’ lineout options, there’s no doubt that the breakdown expertise and tempo that the three bring would cause significant problems for England.So, how do England and Eddie Jones counter such an aggressive game plan?One way, and there’s plenty of historical evidence in Australian rugby to support this, would be to get a Kiwi to do it for them.Born in Opotiki in the Bay of Plenty, back-rower Teimana Harrison is having a breakout season in the Aviva Premiership and Champions Cup with Northampton Saints. The versatile flanker, who has actually shone at No 8 this season, is a former captain of Rotorua Boys’ High School, the same school that produced Harrison’s team-mate and current England captain Dylan Hartley.Man on the run: Teimana Harrison’s performance against Saracens has cast him into the England spotlightHarrison qualifies to wear the Red Rose through his English father and having spent almost four years now in Northampton, there’s little doubt that he has served his apprenticeship and therefore there should be no qualms about selecting him.Just like Hartley, he moved to England as a teenager and has developed as a player in the Premiership, playing with that same level of intensity that has characterised Hartley’s career thus far. There can be few doubts that Harrison would also bring that energy and dedication to white of England. Double-trouble: Could Michael Hooper and David Pocock be joined by Sean McMahon? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS With the weeks counting down to England departing for Australia, stopping the attacking trident David Pocock, Michael Hooper and Sean McMahon may need some lateral thinking from Eddie Jonescenter_img If Cheika does opt for a back row of Pocock, Hooper and McMahon, it is an understandable concern that England’s current back row, who acquitted themselves very well in the Six Nations, may struggle to match the tempo of the Australian trio on fast tracks.The simplest way to counter three jackals, such as the Wallabies have, is to, for wont of a better word, smash them at the breakdown. At every breakdown, England will have to expect one of those three to be positioning themselves over the ball and preparing to steal it. Whilst that is one of the most basic defensive goals of any team in rugby, few teams have three operators as canny and effective as ‘McPooper’.Risk: Would England consider breaking up the Robshaw and Haskell axis?If James Haskell were to shift over to blindside and bring his non-stop motor and power on the clear-out to the six jersey, freeing up the seven shirt for Harrison, England would have two flankers capable of securing ball as proficiently as possible against the predatory fetching of the Australians. It would be extremely harsh to relegate Chris Robshaw to the bench, but it is a horses for courses selection.Harrison has been ripping up trees for Northampton all season, even when the Saints were struggling early on in the campaign, and he has done wonders to help minimise the loss of Samu Manoa, following the American’s move to Toulon. He’s not the power carrier that Manoa was, but his dynamism with ball in hand and at the breakdown, not to mention his athleticism, have been aces up Northampton’s sleeve all season long.If England can at least limit the breakdown impact of the Australian back row, as containing it completely is improbable, bordering on impossible, then there are other areas where they should be able to profit.Weapons: Maro Itoje and George Kruis could prosper from Australia’s weakness in the lineoutWith potentially just two specialist lineout jumpers in the Wallaby pack, the in-form duo of Maro Itoje and George Kruis could be salivating at their prospects of hunting down Australia’s lineout. The pair were excellent disrupting opposition throws throughout the Six Nations and have continued on in that fashion with Saracens in the Premiership and Europe. If they can take the lineout away as a solid platform for Australia, they move England that bit closer to success.Pocock, Hooper and McMahon are all effective carriers and more than capable of running a defence-splitting line or supporting Australia’s deadly backs, but as a back row they would lack for power carriers in the tight. There would be no Billy Vunipola equivalent to hand the ball off to and ensure that the gain-line is broken or that multiple defenders will be tied in stopping one attacker. The Aussie trio are players that defences, when drifting, can trust their inside man to make a one-on-one tackle on and therefore continue to drift out and not create overlaps for the attacking team out wide.Powerhouse: Saracens No 8 Billy Vunipola will be a handful for any opposition defenceBeing able to attack the opposition lineout and keep your defensive organisation seem like marginal benefits on paper when compared to the breakdown savvy that Australia could be working with, but they are benefits which can lead to overall success for England in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney.Utilising a player with the physical and technical skill set that Harrison has would be key to combatting arguably Australia’s greatest strength and allowing other areas of the England team to attack the chinks in the Wallabies’ armour. For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click herelast_img read more

Six Nations Round Two: Five Things We Learnt

first_imgThe March issue of Rugby World magazine – a Six Nations special – is on sale now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. From Eddie Jones’s big calls to the influence of Antoine Dupont, Jacob Whitehead reflects on the latest championship action Eddie Jones got big selection calls rightEddie Jones has copped a lot of flak over the past week. England’s loss to France in the opening round of the Six Nations has been blamed variously on his selection of Tom Curry at No 8, his incitement of the French team before the game and his failure to psychologically prepare his players to bounce back from a World Cup final defeat.Whether Curry will ever flourish at the base of the pack remains to be seen, but Jones was criticised in the build-up to the Scotland game for not picking any back-three replacements. What if a winger gets injured?However, the six-two split between forwards and backs was crucial, allowing Jones to name Joe Launchbury, Courtney Lawes and Ben Earl on the bench. Launchbury shored up the lineout in awful conditions, Lawes’s physicality was a second force of nature, while Earl hit two beautiful lines and helped pull over Ellis Genge for the vital score.New Welsh style is already apparent Wales under Warren Gatland were built on gain-line dominance, fitness and defensive organisation. Their half-backs made very few mistakes, and at the same time took fairly few risks.Wales’ loss to Ireland in Dublin this weekend seemed to show quite clearly a change of style. They offloaded 13 times against Ireland, including a couple of sensational passes to set up Tomos Williams’s score. It was entertaining, attacking rugby, with the props in particular demonstrating some hitherto unseen handling skills.However, Wales were also culpable for a series of mistakes that led directly to tries – poor tackling for Jordan Larmour’s score, two sloppy lineouts and over-ambition when running the ball out from defence for Andrew Conway’s try. They also threw ten bad passes – a new term in post-match statistics! – compared to zero from Ireland.Wayne Pivac’s Scarlets won the Pro12 in 2017 with this all-court style, as they slowly upskilled to cut out the mistakes and learnt the right areas of the field to take risks in.Wales are only at the beginning of a World Cup cycle – it will be exciting to see how they develop over the next four years.Is this the tournament of the back-row? The first six games of the Six Nations threw up a remarkable statistical anomaly, with the Man of Match award given on each occasion to a back-rower.Justin Tipuric, CJ Stander, Gregory Alldritt (both twice!) and Sam Underhill have all won the post-game gong, primarily (with the possible exception of Underhill) for the excellence of their breakdown work.What does this tell us? Are we finally recognising the importance of the breakdown as a specialist skill, something noted by Wales when they appointed Sam Warburton as a dedicated breakdown coach?Or is it because more teams are now spreading their fetchers across the field rather than asking them to chase the ball around the park, resulting in speedier and more impactful involvements?Antoine Dupont takes France to another level Fast mover: Antoine Dupont makes a break for France (Getty Images)France have been well-known for producing incredible scrum-halves and Antoine Dupont looks poised to become the latest in that long line. He has been on the international scene for a couple of years, so his class isn’t so much something new as a talent realised – and his importance is growing.Morgan Parra and Maxime Machenaud have previously offered excellent game management without the sniping threat of the traditional French petit-general, whereas Dupont has taken this French team to another level with his multi-talented skills.The Toulouse half-back could arguably have been Man of the Match in each of France’s first two matches, with his looped pass to Gregory Alldritt the highlight of Sunday’s 35-22 win over Italy.His importance to the team is such that it has freed up the raw Romain Ntamack to focus on his attacking game – a mantle taken up beautifully by the fly-half as he dummied and galloped through for the bonus-point try in the second-half.Related: Toulouse trio Antoine Dupont, Romain Ntamack and Thomas RamosAnother positive for France? Dupont and Ntamack’s replacements, Baptiste Serin and Matthieu Jalibert, were both equally box-office when they came on.Blue skies shone despite the weather for les Bleus. Wales may well look to shut them out by closing the roof at the Principality Stadium in two weeks.The Allan-Canna combination gives Italy some attacking identityFor a long time, Italy have relied on power and territory to score tries, occasionally being blessed by the occasional piece of magic from Matteo Minozzi or opportunism from Michele Campagnaro.Conditions were difficult in Paris, but Italy still showed attacking ambition. Coach Franco Smith has picked fly-half Carlo Canna at inside-centre for the first two rounds, pairing him with the underrated Tommaso Allan, giving Italy two distributors for the first time since Andrea Masi’s retirement.Fine line: Tommaso Allan has been playing close to the gain-line (Getty Images)When Italy attacked well, their forwards won very quick ball and Allan stood extremely flat, always a threat to jink inside or put his outside man through a hole.Playing this close to the gain-line means that the fly-half is always at risk of being caught up in the breakdown, but Smith’s selection of Canna meant that the 12 is able to step in at first receiver at the next phase, meaning Italy’s attacks lost none of their momentum.Italy were sometimes guilty of overplaying, whilst the handling of their forwards left a lot to be desired. Nevertheless there were real moments of excitement out wide for Minozzi and Mattia Bellini. Hopefully when Smith’s interim reign ends the new coach will share his ideals.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Focus: Eddie Jones oversees England’s warm-up at Murrayfield (Getty Images) last_img read more

Italy prop Cherif Traoré: “I want to be one of the best front-rows in Europe”

first_img From the off: Cherif Traore will make his first Test start for Italy against France (Getty Images) This article originally appeared in the February 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Both of Traoré’s brothers played football for Parma, Mohamed Lamine in the first team and Abdoulaye in the youths. His own sporting journey also started out with calcio, but as a “really nasty defender”, the yellow and red cards began to mount up and his dad suggested he switch horses.Viadana, in so many senses, was the making of him. He speaks warmly of the influence of Franco Bernini, the former Italy age-grade coach who oversaw Viadana’s first and so far only league title before focusing his efforts on the youth section where Traoré was making his way.“He really stuck his neck out on me and backed me. He said I would become the first black prop to play for Italy and I have. He is so happy for me. Any time I’m in Parma, I go and see him and it’s like looking at the sun: he’s so happy for me. He was so good at setting me an example of how to be, on and off the park, and it’s those same ideas that I still have in my head to guide me now.“I’d come home from school and the club minibus would be waiting there to take me to training. I’d quickly get some food down me and head to see Franco in the gym. He’d stick me on the running machine and keep turning up the speed. If I ever stopped, even for just a second, he’d be shouting at me! He saw that I had potential and he wanted to make sure I didn’t waste it.”There is a certain irony in Traoré now being an established figure with Benetton. The Treviso outfit and Viadana were huge rivals in the days when a young Traoré was a fixture on the terraces of the Stadio Luigi Zaffanella for first-team games. There wasn’t much love lost in any direction.“I was Viadana’s number one fan. It always seemed to be Viadana-Benetton in the Super Ten final and Benetton always won! I hated them! Now that I’m playing for them, I realise it’s not good to hate teams, because you never know what’s going to happen in the future.”Stop sign: Cherif Traore on defensive duty against Ireland in the 2019 Six Nations (Getty Images)Traoré played at No 8, in the centres and once on the wing before settling in the front row when he reached U18 level. At 5ft 11in and just over 18st, he is far from the biggest prop, but boasts the throwback gift of being able to play on both sides.While the likes of Giosuè Zilocchi, Simone Ferrari and especially Danilo Fischetti all impressed in the autumn, it is Traoré who will start at loosehead in the opening game of the 2021 Six Nations against France.“It’s difficult to cover both sides of the scrum, so hopefully it can be an advantage for me. I’m officially a loosehead but I also like playing on the other side. If one of my team-mates is in trouble or injured, I can move there. It’s something I’ve always wanted to do – be able to support others.“At loosehead, it’s fundamental to work hand in hand with the hooker. You must learn how to use your arm, and always keep your back and hips low. That can help the hooker, and your tighthead, make the scrum go forward. At tighthead, you’re working on your own. You need to get really low and put pressure with your neck on the opposing prop.“There are lots of good Italian props at the moment, in the national team and both franchises. I’ll do everything to show my worth. I need my determination to be as big as my dreams, and the Six Nations is one of my biggest ones.“Singing the anthem, especially in the Olimpico in Rome, is something that gives me a super charge to go out and fight for my country. It’s not often I cry, but that’s one of the few things that makes me want to do it. I just love pulling on that blue shirt, for my family, my friends and the whole country.“We all know and understand Franco’s objectives and what he likes: players who are super fit, who want to stand up and fight to win games. These are things I expect from myself, and have done since I was a young kid starting out.”Religion underpins Traoré’s approach to life. His family are all practising Muslims, and he has recently found a new prayer companion in Monty Ioane, his Benetton and Italy team-mate.“I know many people in Italy who have converted from Christianity to Islam. Italy is a very Catholic country but there are mosques in a lot of places now. I always thought of myself as the only Muslim on the team, but now I have Monty too. We often go to the mosque together, and when we are away with the team we go to each other’s rooms to pray.”Cherif Traoré knows what he wants – and he also knows what’s important.center_img The Benetton front-rower, who can pack down on both sides of the scrum, talks to Mark Palmer about what inspires him Italy prop Cherif Traoré: “I want to be one of the best front-rows in Europe”Cherif Traoré has some very clear objectives. “I want to be a reference point in the teams I play for,” explains the 26-year-old Benetton and Italy prop, now recovered from the facial injury that kept him out of the Autumn Nations Cup.“My goal is to become one of the best front-rows not just in this country but in Europe. I don’t say this out of egotism – it has always been my aim.”Sidiki Conde had big plans too. Like Traoré, his family had moved to Italy from Guinea when he was a child, in search of a better life. Like Traoré, he had found fun, friends and purpose at Viadana rugby club, where he was a rising star of the U14s.The two families were close. Sidiki would mine Traoré for information on the game. The bigger lad was already part of the FIR academy near Pisa, and Sidiki had every intention of following in his footsteps.“His dream was to become a professional player,” says Traoré. “He was always asking me for advice and tips. He was my little friend and I loved spending time in his company.”Green giant: Cherif Traoré in Pro14 action for Benetton (Inpho)One night in May 2013, everything changed. Sidiki was round at the Traoré family home in Boretto, a village half an hour’s drive north-east of Parma. The 13-year-old would often come over to battle Mohamed Lamine and Abdoulaye, Traoré’s brothers, on the PlayStation. That night Sidiki seemed out of sorts and while waiting for his turn, suddenly announced he was heading home.“He went down the stairs, opened the front door and went out,” begins Traoré, with evident emotion in his voice. “He collapsed in front of our building. There’s a bar there where lots of people from the village go. The owner came and rang our doorbell, my brother came down the stairs, took the kid in his arms and put some covers on him.“He was shouting at him to stay with us, giving him little slaps on the face to keep him going while the ambulance arrived. My brother remembers him smiling at him, but he passed away in his arms.”Sidiki had been treated for breathing difficulties, and there was a thought that his sudden collapse may have been due to a pulmonary embolism. Whatever the explanation, his death provoked shock, not least in the local African community of which the Traoré clan is a central plank.“He had a very close bond with my family, he was pretty much part of it. He was always at our house, basically a brother to us. Me, my brothers and sister, my mum and dad, we all loved him. I just couldn’t believe it could happen; that a great, young guy could be taken away from us like that.“I was at the academy when it happened and when I got a train back the next morning, my brothers were all over the place. It was such a terrible thing.”Every year an U14 tournament is held in Sidiki’s honour in Viadana, and Traoré is always there to hand out the medals and remember his friend. He now lives in Treviso, where he’s been part of the Benetton set-up since 2015, but Boretto remains his bolthole.In pre-Covid times, he would be back there every weekend, meeting his childhood friends to talk rugby, surfing and hip hop. Traoré is proud of his Guinean roots but this is home, and has been since he arrived as a French-speaking seven-year-old with next to no knowledge of the country, the culture or the language.“My father was already here in Europe and because he missed his wife and children so much, he decided to move us all over. I didn’t understand anything about Italy to begin with, but I soon made some great schoolfriends who really helped me.“They invited me to their houses, which was a great way to get to know people and how things work. I’ve never had any real difficulties – I’ve got great friends. We cook and go surfing together.”Maxime Mbandà, another black Italy international, was the victim of racist abuse from a fellow driver on the roads of Milan in 2019, but Traoré says he’s “never” had any issues in a country where even internal animosity between regions is never far from the surface.“I’m quite a laid-back person and fortunately I’ve never had these kinds of problems. Maybe behind my back people call me names, but nobody has ever said something like that to my face. Maybe people are scared by my size!”last_img read more

Model village to equip Haitians

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA By Marites N. Sison Posted Apr 5, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Model village to equip Haitians Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Haiti Jean-Denis Hilaire, LWF project coordinator, and Naba Gurung, PWRDF humanitarian response coordinator, look across at the hillside where the Gressier Model village will be built. Photo/Simon Chambers[Anglican Journal – Anglican Church of Canada] Work has begun on a $5.5 million model village in Gressier, the municipality west of Port-au-Prince that was one of the hardest hit by the 2010 earthquake. The project will provide housing and livelihood support for 1,200 Haitians in a unique, self-governing community setting.The Lutheran World Federation and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) has committed $3.5 million to the project, which is also supported by the Church of Sweden, the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) and MINUSTAH, the U.N. Stabilization Mission in Haiti. PWRDF will contribute $150,000.The construction project is not just about building homes, said the Rev. Rafael Malpica Padilla, executive director of the ELCA’s global mission work, in a statement. “It is a sign of hope…an attempt to offer a new start for families.”The program “seeks to create a community model that other NGOs and local governments in Haiti can follow,” said Simon Chambers, communications coordinator for PWRDF. Donation of the 58,050 square meters of virgin land (which sits 200 meters above sea level) “is a big step forward,” he added. Ownership of the land, which was donated by the Haitian government, will be transferred to village residents, who will in turn have a small mortgage and be involved in maintaining infrastructure.“Self-governance for all decisions affecting community life” will be promoted, said LWF in a news release. The project will train and equip a community-based disaster risk reduction brigade and the 200 solar-powered housing units, equipped with indoor plumbing, will be “earthquake and cyclone resilient.” There will also be a community center, a playground, community gardens, a green waste system and infrastructure for recycling and environmental sanitation. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

Virginia Seminary announces 3 honorary fellows

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Theological Education Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 People, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Sep 29, 2014 Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Virginia Seminary announces 3 honorary fellows Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing [Virginia Theological Seminary press release] Virginia Theological Seminary’s Center for Anglican Communion Studies announces the appointment of three Honorary Fellows. Rev. Eleanor Sanderson Ph.D. is appointed as CACS Fellow in Public Theology, Rev. William L. Sachs, Ph.D. is appointed as CACS Fellow in World Anglicanism and Ms. Zeyneb Sayilgan is appointed as CACS Fellow in Peace and Reconciliation.Dean and President of VTS, Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. observed, “This is an exciting development in the life of the Center for Anglican Communion Studies and the life of Virginia Theological Seminary. We are delighted to recognize the work of three outstanding thinkers and practitioners whose work resonates deeply with the priorities we have at the seminary.”The Director of CACS, Rev. Robert S. Heaney Ph.D., D.Phil. commented, “The Center for Anglican Communion Studies exists to promote and practice deeper community for the Communion. We are delighted that Rev. Sanderson, Rev. Sachs and Ms. Sayilgan have accepted these fellowships as people who reflect and enhance our vision. We look forward to working with them further and partnering with them in ways that are mutually beneficial.” Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rev. Ellie Sanderson, Ph.D.CACS Fellow in Public TheologyEleanor Sanderson is a priest in the Anglican Church of Aotearoa New Zealand and Polynesia. Sanderson has combined her service in the church with an involvement in community development work and ongoing community research projects. She is a former Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at Otago University. Sanderson’s research has primarily focused on the interplay between international community development and Christian spirituality, with a particular attention to the spiritual wisdom of women involved in grass roots community action. She was recently the Weaver (Key note speaker) for the conference Anglican Women at Prayer, Weaving our Bonds of Affection co-hosted by the Center for Anglican Communion Studies and the Society for the Companions of the Holy Cross. She lives with her family of husband Tim and children Zac (aged 6) and Joe (aged 4) and currently serves as Vicar of the Parish of Eastbourne in the Diocese of Wellington, New Zealand.Rev. William L. Sachs, Ph.D CACS Fellow in World AnglicanismWilliam L. Sachs is an Episcopal priest, consultant, scholar, and author. He directs the Center for Interfaith Reconciliation and assists at St. Stephen’s Church in Richmond, Virginia. Previously Sachs was Vice-President of the Episcopal Church Foundation in New York and a priest serving parishes in Virginia, Chicago, and Connecticut.Author of six books, over 200 articles and cited by major media outlets, he has been Visiting Professor of Church History at Virginia Theological Seminary and at Yale Divinity School. He has been a Chabraja Fellow at Seabury-Western Seminary and adjunct faculty at Union Theological Seminary (Virginia) and the University of Richmond. He has addressed interfaith events in Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Pakistan, and Qatar and led travel groups to various countries in the Middle East. Sachs consults with Family Health International, an international source of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. He conducted USAID-funded research on the response to this disease by religious groups in seven countries, and sits on the Protection of Human Subjects Committee which reviews HIV/AIDS research. He has also consulted with the Lilly Endowment and the Luce Foundation on religious leadership. He is a trustee of the Elizabeth Raymond Ambler Charitable Trust of Wilton, Connecticut.Sachs received the PhD at the University of Chicago in modern religious history after earning degrees from Baylor, Vanderbilt, and Yale. A native of Richmond, he is married to Elizabeth Austin Tucker. His daughter, Elizabeth Sloan Smith, has two young sons and directs mobile applications and branding for the Weather Channel in Atlanta.Ms. Zeyneb Sayilgan M.A.CACS Fellow in Peace and ReconciliationZeyneb Sayilgan is currently a Senior Fellow and Luce Muslim visiting scholar in the Center for Anglican Communion Studies, Virginia Theological Seminary. Her doctoral research at Georgetown University’s Theology department focuses on the intersection of Islamic theology and immigration. Sayilgan obtained her BA/MA degrees in Islamic Studies and Law at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany in 2004. In 2008 she graduated from Hartford Seminary, CT with an MA in Islamic Studies and Christian-Muslim relations.Zeyneb writes frequently on matters concerning Islam and Muslim immigrants in Europe on the online journal MIGAZIN (Migration in Germany). She is also the book review editor of the Journal of Studies of Interreligious Dialogue and a reviewer for the Journal of Ecumenical Studies. Her research interests are Islamic theology and ethics, Christian-Muslim relations and Islam in the West. Zeyneb serves as Program Fellow at the Study of the US Institutes on Religious Pluralism directed by the Department of State. She was adjunct faculty of the Washington Theological Consortium and the Catholic University of America in DC. From 2010-2014, she served along with her husband Salih as Chaplain-in-Residence on Georgetown’s diverse campus organizing a variety of student programs.She is fluent in Turkish, Kurdish, German, English, has reading skills in Arabic and Farsi and traveled to Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Burma, Malaysia, Singapore and many European countries to explore interfaith dynamics on the ground.  Sayilgan and her husband live on campus at VTS. Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

San Joaquin’s ‘Tour Against Trafficking’ aims to raise awareness, stamp…

first_img Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Human Trafficking Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL September 18, 2015 at 2:41 pm Thank you, Pat, for yet another great story and this one, again, on a very important issue. I hope there will be at least two more distributed by ENS, one halfway through the trip focusing on one or more communities along the bicycle tour, and another written at the finish line! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Jerry Hames says: Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (2) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. September 16, 2015 at 3:47 pm Good job! Such an important but traditionally unaddressed issue in our valley. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Episcopal News Service] Diana Cisneros, 29, of Bakersfield, California, had spent much of Sept. 13 helping a human trafficking victim find safe haven.“My husband was on his way to church and he saw this young girl, running from a hotel with no shoes on; it was a red flag to him,” she told the Episcopal News Service the next day.“He pulled the car over and talked to her; she turned out to be a victim of human trafficking. We were able to get her help and to get her to a safe place,” said Cisneros, herself a trafficking survivor.Cisneros is featured in the documentary film, “The Trafficked Life”. It highlights a series of interviews with survivors and is a cornerstone of the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin’s Oct. 2-23 bicycle Tour Against Trafficking, to raise awareness and funds to halt trafficking in California’s Central Valley, according to Bishop David Rice.Shortly after his 2014 election, Rice realized “the Central Valley of California was a thoroughfare and significant vein for human trafficking” yet few seemed aware of its existence or the human devastation, he said.Common forms of human trafficking use fraud, force and coercion to pigeonhole people into migrant work or sexual situations for profit.The former New Zealander tackled the issue with, in the language of the indigenous Maori, a hikoi – an intentional physical movement with a purpose, bringing together church and community groups to raise awareness and funds to tackle solutions.For Rice, an avid bicyclist, a bike tour across the diocese seemed natural. So far, 40 riders have signed up to log all or part of the 18-day, 745-mile trip from Taft through the Sierras to Modesto.Cyclists of all levels have the option to participate in one or all of the legs of the route, including 26 stops at each of the diocese’s parishes and missions, and to select which of six local anti-trafficking organizations they wish to support.Filmmaker Michael Fagans said “The Trafficked Life” documentary has been screened across the diocese, along with participation from panels of local activists. “Community by community, we’re seeding the ground so that, when the tour comes, we’re not having to educate people,” Fagans told ENS. “Their hearts have already been touched.”Trafficking, “cuts across all economic strata, across race,” added Fagans, who also is joining the tour as a rider. The film and tour have drawn ecumenical as well as “church-broad” support from other dioceses and to date has raised about $13,000.Statistics show that California has three major hotspots for trafficking – San Diego, San Francisco and the Central Valley, Rice said.But statistics about the prevalence of trafficking typically “are difficult to come by,” said Cisneros. “We’re talking about an underground criminal organization.” But, it is estimated there are about 300,000 youth in the United States who are minors and at risk for being exploited sexually, she said.The California Attorney General’s office in 2010 estimated that some 12.3 million people globally are trafficked, or are modern-day slaves, with less than one percent of the victims being identified.Cisneros said that from the age of 7 to 16 years she was sexually trafficked to strangers by her father, a preacher. At 16, she left home and was able to seek help from relatives in another state, she said.“Sexual abuse breaks you down and completely distorts your thinking,” she said. “I was very fearful; I didn’t trust people at all.” Through the assistance of friends and local anti-trafficking groups, she fought her way back, and recently earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology.A member of the steering committee of the Kern Coalition Against Human Trafficking, one of the six groups participating in the Tour Against Trafficking, Cisneros said her goal is to raise awareness that it “is a very real problem and people can be part of the solution.”Everyone should be armed with a toll-free trafficking hotline number to offer to someone who appears to need help, she said. It also helps to pay attention to signs that might indicate a trafficking situation.“Traffickers have a network of people they work with and, if everyone of us gets educated, we can be a part of the anti-trafficking network,” she said. “The wider our network is, the more victims we’re going to be able to help.”Rice agreed. “The language I’ve adopted is ‘unawareness equals complicity,’ ” he said. “Our task is to raise awareness of difficulties people face, and … the crimes that are committed and have to be addressed.”The National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline is (888) 373-7888.– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA San Joaquin’s ‘Tour Against Trafficking’ aims to raise awareness, stamp out slavery Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC PJ Cabbiness says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Pat McCaughanPosted Sep 16, 2015 Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Tagslast_img read more

Episcopal Church prepares for Curry’s history-making installation

first_imgEpiscopal Church prepares for Curry’s history-making installation Weekend of celebrations to mark the beginning of new presiding bishop’s term Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET November 1, 2015 at 8:30 am Thrilled for The Episcopal Church on this day, I served on the staffs of Katharine Jefferts Schori, Frank Tracy Griswold, and Edmond Lee Browning, which is when I first knew Michael Curry through our common work in congregational development and community engagement in the early 1990s. The consensus of a landslide election from his peers in the House of Bishops gives a special opening for mapping out a new path forward and we have already seen the response from people in and beyond the church who have gotten to know him: a rare combination of evangelical zeal and commitment to equity and justice wrapped in a compassionate touch that is authentic to his core, wishing every blessing on this day of investiture! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME November 1, 2015 at 2:30 pm I am overjoyed!!! I’ve been a part of this church for almost 40 years and never have I seen the likes of this!!! An Evangelical Presiding Born-Again Bishop!!!!!!!!!!!!! We have hope today to “GO” and tell it from the mountains that Jesus Christ Reigns!!!! Come close world! This is all for each and every one! Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Comments (5) Peter Lafford says: Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Thom Chu says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA November 1, 2015 at 9:06 am We are so blessed in Bishop Curry! I didn’t think I could be happier for the Episcopal Church than when Bishop J-S was installed, but it’s glory to glory. I prophesy here and now that Bishops Michael and Francis will get along like tinder and spark, and the world will glow with the light of the Spirit flowing through them. Hallelujah, for All the Saints! Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR October 30, 2015 at 4:37 pm I am excited to be on my way to Washington to attend the Installation with my sister and brother. Bishop Curry was a student of my father’s, Lindsay Lafford, Professor of Music and Organist at Hobart College. To honor that connection, Bishop Curry asked that some of my father’s music be included in the Organ Prelude. We are humbled by the request, which also honors my father’s legacy to the Episcopal and Anglican church, in which he was active from the age of nine as a chorister, then organ scholar, at Hereford Cathedral, England, followed by four years as Organist at St. John’s Cathedral, Hong Kong, from 1935-39, before coming to America for a long academic career. He continued to compose and play for services up until his death in 2014 at the age of 101 1/2, in Tempe, Arizona. More on his history and music is on his website, http://Lord-of-Ridley.com. Peach McDouall says: Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 30, 2015 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curry Installation, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Michael Curry, shown here peaching in July 2014 at the Episcopal Youth Event in Philadelphia, will be installed Nov. 1 as The Episcopal Church’s 27th presiding bishop and its primate in a historic celebration at Washington National Cathedral. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church will make history Nov. 1 as it celebrates the All Saints Sunday installation of Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry as its 27th presiding bishop and its primate.On that day, Curry, 62, will become the first person of color to hold the position of presiding bishop and primate. The Holy Eucharist with the installation begins at noon EST (daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. Nov. 1) at Washington National Cathedral. Curry will preach and celebrate the Eucharist.The service will be webcast live and be available at three different locations:The cathedral’s website with English and Spanish versions;This page on the cathedral’s YouTube channel; andThe General Convention Office’s website.The live webcast will be closed-captioned for the hearing-impaired.After the service, on-demand video viewing of the Eucharist will be available here.Episcopal, Anglican, ecumenical, and interreligious guests will join bishops, General Convention deputies, Executive Council members and other leaders, members and guests of The Episcopal Church for the celebration.At the beginning of the service, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, along with House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings and others, will welcome Curry at the door and participate with him in the early part of the service, which includes questions to him, renewal of the baptismal covenant, Curry’s seating in the cathedral (Washington National Cathedral has been the presiding bishop’s seat since 1941), the handing over of the primatial staff and prayers for the new presiding bishop by representatives of the ecumenical and interreligious communities and the Anglican Communion. Later in the service the readings and the prayers of the people will be read in various languages.The order of service is available for downloading here.The day before the installation, the Union of Black Episcopalians will host a Vigil Celebration for Curry at 11 a.m. EDT at the D.C. Armory. The Rev. Canon Sandye Wilson, who will preach at the service, has said the service will be a time to be with Curry and pray with him.Jefferts Schori will preside at the Eucharist and Curry will celebrate.There is no charge to attend the vigil and tickets are not necessary; however registration is requested to provide for ample programs, seats, etc. Registration is available here.The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society will sponsor a live webcast of the vigil celebration here.Elected at General ConventionThe House of Bishops elected Curry June 27 during General Convention on the first ballot. It was a landslide; he received 121 votes of a total 174 cast. The number of votes needed for election was 89. It was the first time the bishops had elected a presiding bishop on the first ballot.Diocese of Southwest Florida Bishop Dabney Smith, Diocese of Southern Ohio Bishop Thomas Breidenthal and Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas were the other nominees.Curry’s election was confirmed an hour later by the House of Deputies, as outlined in the church’s canons, by a vote of 800 to 12.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, shown here speaking at the Diocese of Newark clergy conference Oct. 26, will complete her nine-term in office at the end of the day Oct. 31. Photo: Cynthia L. BlackThis makes the second time in a row that the church will make history with its installation of a presiding bishop. In 2006, current Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori became the first woman elected presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church. She was also the first female among the primates, or ordained leaders, of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, a distinction she still holds. Jefferts Schori had been elected June 18, 2006 during the 75th meeting of General Convention.The roles of the presiding bishopThe presiding bishop is chief pastor and primate of the church, chair of the Executive Council, and president of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. The canonical outline of the presiding bishop’s election and term can be found in Title I Section 2 of the church’s Canons.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)According to Title I Section 2, the presiding bishop as chief pastor and primate is “charged with responsibility for leadership in initiating and developing the policy and strategy in the church and speaking for the church as to the policies, strategies and programs authorized by the General Convention.”The presiding bishop also “speaks God’s word to the church and world as the representative of this church and its episcopate in its corporate capacity,” represents The Episcopal Church to the Anglican Communion, serves as chief consecrator of bishops, and leads the House of Bishops. He or she also holds a significant role in the discipline and changes in status of bishops, according to Title I Section 2.Also, the presiding bishop exercises a significant role in the governance of the church by making appointments to various governing bodies, making decisions with the president of the House of Deputies, serving as a member of every churchwide committee and commission, and serving as chair and president of key church governing boards. He or she is the chair and chief executive officer of the Executive Council, which is the board of directors for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, according to Canon I.4, and oversees the execution of the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention and carried out by the society.The staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society report to the presiding bishop, who is the society’s president, either directly or through a group of senior staff and officers who, according to canon, report and are accountable directly to the presiding bishop. (The office of the General Convention, by canon, maintains a separate reporting structure.)Washington National Cathedral in northwest Washington, D.C., will be the site of the Nov. 1 installation of Bishop Michael Curry as The Episcopal Church’s 27th presiding bishop and its primate. Photo: Washington National CathedralIn its “Call to Discernment and Profile”, the joint nominating committee said the 27th presiding bishop would need to be “comfortable in the midst of ambiguity and able to lead the church in the rich, temporal space between the ‘now,’ and the ‘yet to come.’ ” The person discerned and elected by the church would need to “delight” in the diversity of a “multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-generational church.” And, because “our polity has many components and complexities,” the 27th presiding bishop will need the “skills and wisdom for leading complex and democratic systems through a time of significant change.”Originally, the office of presiding bishop was filled automatically by the most senior bishop in the House of Bishops, measured by date of consecration, beginning with the presidency of William White at the first session of the 1789 General Convention. That process changed in 1925 when the church elected the Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray as the 16th presiding bishop.Presiding Bishop-elect Curry’s past ministryBorn in Chicago, Illinois, on March 13, 1953, Curry attended public schools in Buffalo, New York, and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Hobart and William Smith Colleges, in Geneva, New York, and a Master of Divinity degree in 1978 from the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale. He has also studied at the College for Preachers, Princeton Theological Seminary, Wake Forest University, the Ecumenical Institute at St. Mary’s Seminary, and the Institute of Christian Jewish Studies.He was ordained to the diaconate in June 1978 at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Buffalo, New York, and to the priesthood in December 1978 at St. Stephen’s, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He began his ministry as deacon-in-charge at St. Stephen’s, and was rector there 1979-1982. He next accepted a call to serve as the rector of St. Simon of Cyrene, Lincoln Heights, Ohio, where he served 1982-1988. In 1988, he became rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Maryland, where he served until his election as bishop in 2000.In his three parish ministries, Curry was active in the founding of ecumenical summer day camps for children, the creation of networks of family day-care providers and educational centers, and the brokering of millions of dollars of investment in inner city neighborhoods. He also sat on the commission on ministry in each of the three dioceses in which he has served.During his time as bishop of North Carolina, Curry instituted a network of canons, deacons and youth ministry professionals dedicated to supporting the ministry that already happens in local congregations and refocused the diocese on The Episcopal Church’s dedication to the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals through a $400,000 campaign to buy malaria nets that saved thousands of lives.Throughout his ministry, Curry has also been active in issues of social justice, speaking out on immigration policy and marriage equality.He serves on the boards of a large number of organizations and has a national preaching and teaching ministry. He has been featured on The Protestant Hour and North Carolina Public Radio’s The State of Things, as well as on The Huffington Post website. In addition, Curry is a frequent speaker at conferences around the country. He has received honorary degrees from Sewanee: The University of the South, Virginia Theological Seminary, Yale, and, most recently, Episcopal Divinity School. He served on the Taskforce for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church and is chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s board of directors.His most recent book, Songs My Grandma Sang, was published in June 2015. His book of sermons, Crazy Christians, came out in August 2013.Curry and his wife, Sharon, have two adult daughters, Rachel and Elizabeth.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem October 30, 2015 at 9:21 am A GREAT DAY FOR THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH !! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Christopher Epting says: Jane Kirk _ St. Stephen’s Mission, NH says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more