Wembley Stadium to ban betting sponsors under sale plans

first_img Topics: Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Marketing & affiliates Wembley Stadium to ban betting sponsors under sale plans Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops he UK government has set out plans to prohibit gambling sponsorship deals at Wembley Stadium, should billionaire Shahid Khan prove successful in his bid to purchase the venue. Khan, who also owns English Premier League football club Fulham, has offered £600m (€665.3m/$769.6m) for the stadium and the English Football Association (FA) is expected to make a decision on the bid before the end of the year. However, as reported by The Times in May, Khan would not be permitted to sign a naming rights deal for the venue until 2057, with the FA keen to protect Wembley’s status as the ‘home of English football’.The Times has now said that gambling sponsors would also not be allowed at the stadium, due to the FA’s position on such deals. In June 2017, the FA opted to cut short a partnership with Ladbrokes following a re-examination of its approach to such commercial deals.Current FA rules prohibit players, coaches and referees from betting on football anywhere in the world. The FA decided that it should not associate with betting companies due to this zero-tolerance approach to gambling. The FA agreed to continue working with Ladbrokes and other bookmakers on sharing information on suspect betting patterns, as part of a wider effort to tackle match-fixing in football. The move followed a high-profile case involving former England international Joey Barton, who was handed an 18-month ban from the sport after admitting to a misconduct charge related to betting. Barton, now manager of third-tier, League 1 club Fleetwood Town, was found to have placed over 1,200 bets on matches between March 26, 2006, and May 13, 2016, which is in direct conflict with strict FA betting rules.Image: Paul Arps  Billionaire businessman Shahid Khan has offered £600m to buy the venue Regions: UK & Ireland Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 4th September 2018 | By contenteditor AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

The igaming industry’s 2019 predictions: part two

first_imgBingo As 2019 begins, we talk to the sector’s leading founders, experts and opinion formers about the opportunities and challenges set to define igaming this year. In part two we hear from analysts and experts on technology and innovation and people AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The igaming industry’s 2019 predictions: part two Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Mobile Online Gambling 2018 was packed with significant moments in the industry, from the repeal of PASPA to the rise of crypto. As 2019 begins, we talk to the sector’s leading founders, experts and opinion formers about the opportunities and challenges set to define igaming this year.In part one we heard from operators and suppliers, regulatory experts and marketers. Here we provide insight from analysts and experts on technology and innovation and people.ANALYSTSSimon Holliday, founder, H2 Gambling Capital Paul Leyland, partner, Regulus Partners Simon French, partner, Bixteth PartnersWhat were the defining developments or events of 2018? Simon Holliday: The SCOTUS repealing of PASPA provided the biggest buzz for the sector since the PartyGaming IPO in 2005. Other key developments were the legalisation of sports betting in Argentina (Buenos Aires) and Brazil right at the close of the year, the exponential growth of sports betting in China and mobile becoming something that is no longer being viewed as a sub/emerging interactive channel – rather the two terms are now almost interchangeable.Paul Leyland: The defining developments of 2018 are threefold: a significant tightening of regulatory oversight; a material slowing of growth in some key mature markets (the UK especially); and a material leap in point-of-consumption opportunities – especially in the US, but also in Sweden and Brazil. There is a tendency to see two macro negatives and one positive but all are more nuanced: sustainability might be improving but at the expense of easy growth and cash flow.Simon French: The acquisitions of Ladbrokes Coral by GVC and Sky Betting & Gaming by The Stars Group significantly changed the landscape of igaming in the UK. Added to this were the regulatory, advertising and tax changes in the UK and Italy – the two largest European markets – which effectively signalled the end of relatively laissez-faire approaches to the industry in the EU. On the flipside, the repealing of PASPA by the US Supreme Court offered hope for growth prospects on the other side of the pond.How do you see these continuing to shape the igaming space in 2019? SH: In the US, sports-betting states that adopt mobile will fare far better than those that do not. Even with dot.country launches in Sweden and (hopefully) the Netherlands expected in 2019, H2 expects Europe to have the slowest growth of any region in 2019, at less than 7%. However, the recent developments in Lat Am are expected to lead to more activity both in that region and in Africa. We also predict an increasing use of virtual reality/AI technology as millennials at last become the majority in company tech departments.PL: The regulatory tightening of 2018 will largely be a 2019 event, operationally. Growth will also continue to be a challenge given a combination of this, growing underlying sector maturity and the lack of a major football tournament in the summer. Critically, we will also start to see just how big (or not) some of the new opportunities are and to what extent they impact on existing business practices.SF: Dynamic regulation, increasing taxation and slowing top-line growth all point to ongoing consolidation in 2019, as has already been seen by William Hill’s proposed acquisition of MRG, among others. Reduced advertising in the UK and Italy clearly suggests that bigger players with higher brand recognition will thrive. The shape and pace of change in the US remains uncertain but it also remains unclear how and when non-US-domiciled entities will turn a profit.What do you see as the biggest challenges ahead for the sector in 2019? SH: Generally, the global economy is slowing. Land-based gaming is struggling to adapt and innovate, both in gaining more convergence with mobile and attracting a new millennial demographic. The industry needs to collaborate and speak with one coordinated political voice to articulate the positive arguments of the industry and fend off further regulatory tightening and/or taxation increases.PL: The biggest challenge is simple, in our view: to persuade enough governments that a properly regulated and commercially viable online gambling sector is a good thing. Twenty years of most of the sector behaving to ensure that the opposite view is too often held is by far the biggest risk.SF: Undoubtedly the industry has to convince the powers that be – and the general public at large – that gambling is a respectable form of entertainment enjoyed by millions of people around the world with no negative social consequences. For those consumers for whom gambling leads to negative outcomes, robust measures have to be put in place to identify, challenge and help within the confines of the law and established frameworks of regulating and licensing bodies.TECH AND INNOVATIONJustin Bellinger, chief digital officer, Sure International  Will Mace, head of Kindred Futures What were the defining developments or events of 2018? Justin Bellinger: The emergence of the first companies using blockchain in 2018 – FunFair, TruePlay, BETR and the like – has set the scene for things to come. Now that we have got over the currency hype of this time last year, there is no doubt that the technology has a great place in our sector.Will Mace: In 2018, the first banks made their Open Banking APIs available to licensed bodies and by Q3 2019 all banks will have done so. These APIs give the gambling sector a huge opportunity to revolutionise our approach to often-onerous processes such as registration, verification, AML and SOW, affordability checks and payments. Streamlining these processes has the potential to make for a much-improved customer experience, lower abandon rates and a significant operational saving.How do you see these continuing to shape the igaming space in 2019? JB: There has got to be a place for blockchain in regulatory technology in the igaming sector; that’s one of the reasons that I am pleased that so many igaming crypto innovators launched last year. Even at its lowest common denominator, what better way of ensuring fairness in a game than an immutable log shared between operator and regulator through a permissioned blockchain?WM: Last year also saw a huge development in the use of messaging channels, with Facebook Messenger coming out of beta for gambling operators. I very much hope to see WhatsApp also open up in 2019 and it is finally looking promising. Voice channels such as Alexa and Google Home are unfortunately likely to remain closed to gambling companies, in the short term at least. The rudimentary keyword chatbots have hopefully been consigned to history and are being replaced – albeit slowly – by highly effective, conversational natural-language technologies, enabling a highly effective and immediate engagement channel to seamlessly convert engagement into sports bets.What do you see as the biggest challenges ahead for the sector in 2019? JB: Continuing M&A activity and in-market consolidation points to a sector that has reached maturity. Digital transformation is the natural place for a mature industry player to seek improvements in many areas, be they customer experience, operational efficiency, strategy or technology investment choices. Transformation often requires changing organisational culture, which means messing with people’s hearts and minds – something that is challenging in any sector, but something that I think igaming businesses will face increasingly in the future.WM: One of the most interesting opportunities of 2019 has been afforded by the Malta Gaming Authority’s digital currency/DLT sandbox, and it will be very interesting to see the operator response. Will this be the move that really starts the mainstream ball rolling for gambling with digital currency, lifting it out of the Curaçao mire?PEOPLEAndrew Bulloss, partner and head of global gaming practice, Odgers Berndtson  Alastair Cleland, manging director, Pentasia What were the defining developments or events of 2018? Andrew Bulloss: There are two key things from this year that will have a major impact on the talent agenda in 2019: one was the repeal of PASPA and the other was the continued regulation of the UK market and the ongoing crackdown by the Gambling Commission around customer protection. Both these issues will affect the type of talent required in gaming next year.Alastair Cleland: The talent market opened up in 2018 as the effects of both the PASPA repeal and M&A consolidation were felt worldwide. Talent shortages – particularly technical development and industry-specific leadership – were a critical factor, limiting many businesses’ ability to deliver on growth plans. And despite a huge rise in remote work requests, our industry hasn’t yet effectively harnessed this workforce potential.How do you see these continuing to shape the igaming space in 2019? AB: As the US igaming and sports betting landscape takes shape, the demand for digital and sports betting talent will increase. US operators are looking for quick fixes to their talent gaps right now and so green card and US visa holders will get first bite of the cherry. Long term, the opportunity for European gaming execs to ply their trade in the US will come, however I do see some digital roles in igaming being filled by US citizens from parallel online sectors.AC: An ever-increased strain on the talent pool is highly likely considering forecasts for significant growth in the US, newly regulating European regions, Latin America, Africa and Asia. For senior professionals, there will be hugely exciting leadership positions on offer. Expanding businesses, though, will need to place the utmost importance on their talent acquisition strategy if their growth plans are to become a reality.What do you see as the biggest challenges ahead for the sector in 2019? AB: The biggest challenge is one of perception and this has implications for talent attraction. Last year was a tough one for the sector, and the perception of the industry with mainstream media and, from my point of view, with potential out-of-sector candidates is sadly at an all-time low. It has become much harder to attract people to the industry. For this reason, the sector needs to come together to challenge perceptions, showcase some of the great technology, innovation and talent within the industry and find ways to get gaming back on the map as a credible career path for people at all levels, from graduates through to experienced hires.AC: Growing our industry’s talent pool has to be a priority this year. We’re increasingly competing with other high-growth industries, such as fintech, blockchain and ecommerce, and we need to ensure we’re attracting, retaining and progressing the best people. Otherwise talent acquisition could well be the industry’s Achilles heel in 2019. Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates People Sports betting Strategy Bingo Poker Social gaming Email Address 15th February 2019 | By Joanne Christie Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Africa Asia Europe LATAM USlast_img read more

Bayes Esports Solutions strikes distribution deal with Riot

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games Bayes Esports Solutions strikes distribution deal with Riot Bayes Esports Solutions today announced that it has acquired the exclusive worldwide data distribution rights of League of Legends esports competitions operated by Riot Games.Under the deal, game data from League of Legends esports competitions will be delivered to media customers and data consumers.Bayes was launched in January through a partnership between Sportradar and big data company DOJO Madness, who have been working together on an exclusive basis to provide the market with live-odds for a wide range of online and offline esports competitions since 2016.In July, Sportradar formed a partnership with Riot Games to monitor betting around League of Legends esports competitions organised by Riot Games and report suspicious activity or integrity issues to the company. Bayes managing director Martin Dachselt said the link to sportradar was an important part of his company’s appeal to Riot.“Sportradar sets the standard in the sports data industry and is an expert in providing crucial services to its customers and federation partners,” Dachselt. said. “Working together with Sportradar, Bayes aims to help League of Legends esports strengthen its ecosystem by creating additional value that will contribute to the sport’s sustainability.“Riot Games operates many of the world’s largest competitive League of Legends events, including the League of Legends World Championship, the League Championship Series and the Mid-Season Invitational. According to CNBC, last year’s League of Legends World Championship drew almost 100m unique viewers.The multi-year agreement will initially cover live data for the regional League of Legends leagues for North America, Europe, and South Korea, as well as the World Championship and Mid-Season Invitational, with further expansion under discussion.Doug Watson, head of esports insights at Riot Games, said: “Riot Games aims to bolster our community engagement and continue to grow the sport. We have the most engaged audience in  the entire global esports ecosystem, and we want to continue to provide them with new and evolving ways to interact with our game.”Mark Balch, Bayes’ head of product and partnerships, added: “The esports industry is growing rapidly, which presents challenges and opportunities. This partnership will help grow League of Legends esports while helping maintain the sports competitive integrity so that it remains the world’s most premier esports scene for generations to come.” Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Casino & games Esports Video gamingcenter_img 9th August 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle Tags: Video Gaming Email Address Bayes Esports Solutions today announced that it has acquired the exclusive worldwide data distribution rights of League of Legends esports competitions operated by Riot Games. Under the deal, game data from League of Legends esports competitions will be delivered to media customers and data consumers.last_img read more

Tabcorp appoints FFA chief executive to board

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address Tabcorp appoints FFA chief executive to board Regions: Oceania Australia AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Tags: Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Australian lotteries and betting operator Tabcorp has appointed David Gallop, currently chief executive of Football Federation Australia, as a non-executive directo of the business. 11th October 2019 | By contenteditor Topics: People Sports betting Strategy People Australian lotteries and betting operator Tabcorp has appointed David Gallop, currently chief executive of Football Federation Australia (FFA), to its board as a non-executive director.The appointment is subject to regulatory and ministerial approvals, with Gallop to serve as an observer on the board from 14 October until the move secures the relevant clearance.An experienced sports administrator, Gallop has served as CEO of the FFA, Australia’s national governing body for football, since 2012, but is due to retire from this role later in the year. Before joining the FFA, he spent ten years as chief executive of the National Rugby League, Australia’s premier professional rugby union competition.“David has successfully led two of Australia’s highest profile sporting organisations in the NRL and FFA; he brings to our board a deep understanding of sports administration and the commercial drivers which underpin it,” Tabcorp chairman Paula Dwyer said.“David has extensive experience in media rights negotiations, delivering modern sporting content through digital channels, customer experience and in navigating complex stakeholder relationships at a domestic and international level.”Tabcorp said the appointment comes amid an ongoing process to renew the Tabcorp board, with the operator expecting to announce further appointments in the coming months.In August, Tabcorp reported revenue of AUD$5.5bn (£2.98bn/€3.39bn/$3.73bn) for its financial year ended 30 June, 2019, with strong growth in lottery revenue offsetting a decline in revenue from its wagering and media division.On a pro-forma basis, considering the combined results of Tabcorp and Tatts for the prior year, revenue was up 8.7% year-on-year. From the date of the closing of the Tatts acquisition on 14 December 2017, and with Tabcorp’s 2017-18 results restated to reflect the discontinuation of the Sun Bets joint venture, revenue was up 45.9%.last_img read more

Spain restricts igaming advertising amid Covid-19 pandemic

first_img1st April 2020 | By contenteditor Topics: Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address The Spanish government has adopted a series of new measures to preserve social and economic order during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, including strict new restrictions on online gaming advertising.Article 37 of Royal Decree 11/2020, which was published in Spain’s Official Gazette yesterday (31 March), states that audiovisual communications for gambling operators will only be permitted to broadcast between 1AM and 5AM.This new advertising window was established in the government’s overhaul of gambling marketing regulations, published in February.However, that provided an exception for advertising around live sports broadcasts that kicked off between 8PM and 5AM. With no sports currently being played, this effectively removes advertising from Spanish screens.Communications on digital channels will also be affected, with individual email communications and direct advertising on social media prohibited. Furthermore, operators may not run acquisition or retention campaigns that offer financial rewards, bonuses, discounts, free bets or games, odds multipliers or any other form of prize.The content of advertising will be monitored, with the decree warning that operators may not implicitly or explicitly refer to the pandemic, or promote gambling as a way to alleviate boredom.Local media reports that the government, took action after the country’s gambling regulator La Dirección General de Ordenación del Juego (DGOJ) revealed that there has been an uptick, rather than a downturn, in gambling activity in recent weeks.Spain, which has already seen its state-owned lottery Sociedad Estatal Loterías y Apuestas del Estado (SELAE) shut down operations, becomes the latest country to introduce new advertising controls or guidelines as a result of the Covid-19 crisis.The Malta Gaming Authority has warned licensees not to mention Covid-19 in their commercial communications, while the Dutch regulator Kansspelautoriteit will impose a €50,000 premium on illegal activity fines for marketing that references the pandemic.The European Gaming and Betting Association (EGBA), meanwhile, has coordinated action between a number of operator associations across Europe, to set out new guidelines for members. Legal & compliance The Spanish government has adopted a series of new measures to preserve social and economic order during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, including strict new restrictions on online gaming advertising. Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Regions: Europe Southern Europe Spain Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Spain restricts igaming advertising amid Covid-19 pandemiclast_img read more

Pinnacle relaunches in Sweden after two-year absence

first_img Online gambling operator Pinnacle has reopened its sports betting website in Sweden under its new gambling licence in the country. Pinnacle had not been active in Sweden for two years, a period during which it was able to both apply for and secure a licence to operate in the country’s newly regulated market. The Swedish Gaming Inspectorate (Spelinspektionen) awarded the licence to the operator in December last year, but Pinnacle held off on relaunching its platform until a later date. After the Swedish government granted permission for the Allsvenskan, the top-tier club football competition in the country, to recommence this week following a period of suspension due the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, Pinnacle chose to push ahead with the launch. “This re-launch is a proud moment as Sweden is a key market for us, with many loyal customers having used Pinnacle over many years,” Pinnacle chief executive Paris Smith said. ”We left the market on good terms and are returning as a fully licensed, regulated operator. We fully embrace the Swedish regulations and wanted to do things in the right way. “Having done so, we now see this as an opportunity to contribute to a serious gaming environment in Sweden long-term and to be a key part in the development of the market.” Pinnacle’s relaunched online platform features a wide range betting options for traditional sports events, as well as esports competitions. Pinnacle relaunches in Sweden after two-year absence Email Address Online gambling operator Pinnacle has reopened its sports betting website in Sweden under its new gambling licence in the country. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 16th June 2020 | By contenteditorcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Sports betting Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden Topics: Sports bettinglast_img read more

Getting comfortable with affordability checks

first_img1st July 2020 | By Stephen Carter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Getting comfortable with affordability checks Legal & compliance It is not just gambling operators grappling with the implications of affordability tests. Consumers are sure to ask why betting and gaming operators need to know the level of personal information that such checks entail. As the industry is pushed ever further on the issue of how much they truly know about their customers, how can technology both enable and ease the way to better systems and practices in this area? By Scott LongleyAffordability checks for online gambling operators in the UK is a concept whose time would appear to have very much arrived. For more than a year, the issue of affordability has been bubbling under as an area of regulatory interest and with the Covid-19 lockdown it rose to the surface.In May, the GB Gambling Commission said in its additional interaction guidance that operators should conduct affordability assessments for any players “picked up by existing or new thresholds and triggers which indicate consumers experiencing harm.” Limits or blocks should be applied until these checks are concluded.Then in June the Commission went further in its guidance for interaction with high-value customers (VIPs).“Licensees should be taking steps to ensure all customers are gambling with money they can afford to lose (lawfully acquired disposable income) and without experiencing harm,” the guidance said. “For the general customer base, this assessment requires a risk-based approach often with the use of thresholds or triggers to alert licensees to the need for additional customer checks.”The Commission clearly feels that affordability tests are a level of compliance whose time has come. As David Clifton, partner with legal consultancy Clifton Davies, says the previous need for gambling operators to know their customers has been “superseded by ‘understand your customer.’”Pressure for change It isn’t difficult to spot where the impetus for affordability checks comes from. “The most obvious pressures are those that stem from public, political, and regulatory criticisms of the industry for not having sufficient KYC checks and, consequently, adequate player-protection measures in place,” says Clive Hawkswood, former chief executive at the Remote Gambling Association (RGA) and now non-executive director at responsible gambling data provider beBettor.“That goes beyond affordability checks and covers all areas where operators might be better able to use the data they hold to analyse player behaviour and intervene where appropriate.”Affordability checks mark the frontier between what was being done before and where we might be heading, suggests Scott McGregor, the chief operating officer and co-founder of beBettor.“There are only so many checks that can be done manually whereas technological tools are able to check hundreds of thousands of customers per day, providing additional intelligence on those customers,” he says.McGregor points out that geo-affordability checks are an effective “first-screening tool; it makes an assessment on any given individual based on largely open source income, demographic and property data but, crucially, without invading an individual’s privacy, affecting one’s credit score or leaving marks behind on any records”.TransUnion, which has its own affordability product for use by the gaming sector, says it uses a combination of individual-level financial data along with socio-demographic and property data.It is an example, says the company’s head of gaming Adam Hancox, of how software and data can support gaming operators in protecting customers from gambling-related harm. “It helps them to better understand their customers, attribute the right levels of support and remain compliant,” he adds.“We’ve realised in the last few months as the affordability regulation keeps coming, operators have different needs,” says McGregor. “Some want our scores and discretionary income estimates to use as guidelines and thresholds. Others want access to our maintained source data for use in their own models.“Ultimately, we realise we’re part of a layered approach to affordability and when customers breach thresholds there will always be an escalation step, whether that is enhanced due diligence or other customer interaction”He points out that beBettor sees itself as “part of operators larger responsible gaming framework.” Everything is contingent, he adds. “We assist with the heavy lifting at the front end. Operators need to take a risk-based approach.“You don’t need to perform source-of-funds checks on every customer, but getting an earnings estimate and supporting data at the front end is helpful. It puts the customers future gambling activity into context.”The safety-belt approach If operators have, as Clifton says, “got the message” on affordability checks, the same is perhaps not quite the case with the consumer. In a general atmosphere of distrust over personal data sharing, the potential for consumers to be nervous against giving over more information than was previously the case is likely to be high.“I can understand why some customers will have such fears,” says Clifton who believes the Commission could be doing more to explain to consumers why operators are asking what would appear to be some “extremely intrusive questions” about their personal financial situations.He points out that at present all the Commission’s own website says about it is on an FAQ page which itself then points users to a Gambling Commission Enforcement report on affordability and consumer protection. “That’s hardly the most user-friendly or satisfactory explanation from a regulator that takes pride in placing the consumer at the heart of gambling regulation,” he says.McGregor points out that at the level of the consumer, the imposition of an affordability check needn’t be intrusive.“The reality is a lot of customers will not realise that an affordability check has been undertaken,” he says. “It’s a bit like a seatbelt – if it’s comfortable, you forget you are wearing it.”He points out that the data sources that are looked at by the beBettor system are open data sources such as housing and negative financial registers such as bankruptcy data. “This isn’t Big Brother; people leave indicators and we are putting that at the disposal of the operators,” he adds.“This is aggregated and anonymised public data which can be used as a yardstick.”Still, given the wider levels of unease on the part of the public with regard to data-sharing at any level, let alone such a sensitive area as finance, Hawkswood suggests that the industry can also do something to allay worries.“A good example of how that could be done was when betting shops produced a leaflet to hand to customers when money laundering checks were made,” he points out. “It was in plain English, explained what the regulatory requirements were, what would be done next, and that all betting shops adopted the same approach.“It is easy to see from a consumer perspective that this would be much more accessible and persuasive than lines of legalistic text that are hidden away in some much longer list of terms and conditions.”Scott Longley has been a journalist since the early 2000s, covering personal finance, sport and gambling. He has worked for a number of publications including Investment Week, Bloomberg Money, Football First., eGaming Review and Gambling Compliance. Scott now runs his own editorial consultancy, Clear Concise Media, and writes for a number of online and print titles. Email Addresscenter_img Topics: Legal & compliance It is not just gambling operators grappling with the implications of affordability tests. Consumers are sure to ask why betting and gaming operators need to know the level of personal information that such checks entail. As the industry is pushed ever further on the issue of how much they truly know about their customers, how can technology both enable and ease the way to better systems and practices in this area? By Scott Longley Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: UK & Irelandlast_img read more

Senate Judiciary Committee debates college betting legality

first_img Senate Judiciary Committee debates college betting legality The US Senate Committee on the judiciary heard evidence both for and against the continued legality of betting on college sports in a committee meeting titled “Protecting the Integrity of College Athletics”. Email Address AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting 23rd July 2020 | By Daniel O’Boylecenter_img The US Senate Committee on the judiciary heard evidence both for and against the continued legality of betting on college sports in a committee meeting titled “Protecting the Integrity of College Athletics”.Heather Lyke, athletic director at the University of Pittsburgh spoke on behalf of the University and Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).“The ACC opposes gambling on collegiate sports,” Lyke said, adding that the decision was supported unanimously by its university presidents and supported by athletic directors.“While we understand that gambling on professional sports is here to stay, we urge Congress to directly address gambling on intercollegiate athletics and prohibit it, as was the case in PASPA.Read more on iGB North America. Regions: US Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Legal & compliancelast_img read more

Combined Caesars-Eldorado business posts $1.17bn loss in H1

first_img Caesars Entertainment Inc. – the new name for the combined Caesars Entertainment Corporation and Eldorado Resorts business – has reported a $1.17bn net loss for the first half of the year. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Combined Caesars-Eldorado business posts $1.17bn loss in H1 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games Caesars Entertainment Inc. – the new name for the combined Caesars Entertainment Corporation and Eldorado Resorts business – has reported a $1.17bn net loss for the first half of the year.Eldorado Resorts completed its acquisition of the Caesars Entertainment Corporation business shortly after the end of the reporting period in a deal worth $17.3bn. The combined business now has a portfolio of more than 55 casino properties around the world.According to a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), combined revenue for the two businesses in the six months to June 30 amounted to $2.79bn, down 50.3% from $5.61bn in the same period last year, due to the impact of closures enforced by the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic.Legacy Eldorado revenue amounted to $599.5m, which was 52.9% lower than $1.27bn in the same period last year, while legacy Caesars revenue was down 43.8% from $1.66bn to $931m.Like all other casino operators in the US, Caesars and Eldorado were forced to shut their locations from mid-March, in line with state orders to combat the spread of Covid-19 and did not start to reopen its facilities until late May and early June.As such, combined revenue from operations in Las Vegas, Nevada, was down 52.4% year-on-year to $931m, while regional revenue fell 50.5% from $3.34bn to $1.66bn. However, other revenue was up slightly from $11m to $14m during the first half.Read the full story on iGB North America. Topics: Casino & games Finance Email Address 7th August 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

BetMGM launches Playtech casino games in New Jersey

first_img24th September 2020 | By Aaron Noy Read the full story on iGB North America. BetMGM, the brand operated through the Roar Digital joint venture between GVC Holdings and MGM Resorts, has launched Playtech’s online casino content in New Jersey. Email Address “Our online casino customers in New Jersey will now be able to enjoy casino games from one of the World’s leading suppliers of gambling software,” BetMGM vice president of gaming, Matthew Sunderland, said. Casino & games Regions: US New Jersey Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Playtech chief operating officer Shimon Akad added: “This is the exciting first step in our partnership which will see us launch in further states with BetMGM across its industry leading portfolio of brands as it expands on its US leadership.center_img Companies: Playtech Under the arrangement, BetMGM will roll out the software across its BetMGM Casino, Borgata Online and PartyCasino NJ brands active in the state. The deal will also allow for similar joint launches in other states where BetMGM is active. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter BetMGM launches Playtech casino games in New Jersey Topics: Casino & games “This strategic deal demonstrates the strength of Playtech’s US proposition and the appeal of our gaming offering in the region as we continue to launch our pipeline of new US licensees.”last_img read more