The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) 2018 Abridged Report

first_imgThe Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Investment sector has released it’s 2018 abridged results.For more information about The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu)  2018 abridged results.Company ProfileThe Bee Equity Partners Limited (formerly Forward Investment and Development Enterprises Limited) operates as a private equity firm that is involved in small to medium enterprise investments. The company also offers financial solutions for entrepreneurs in Mauritius. The company’s segments include stone crushing, block making and investment activities. The Bee Equity Partners Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

Episcopal Church prepares for Curry’s history-making installation

first_imgEpiscopal Church prepares for Curry’s history-making installation Weekend of celebrations to mark the beginning of new presiding bishop’s term Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET November 1, 2015 at 8:30 am Thrilled for The Episcopal Church on this day, I served on the staffs of Katharine Jefferts Schori, Frank Tracy Griswold, and Edmond Lee Browning, which is when I first knew Michael Curry through our common work in congregational development and community engagement in the early 1990s. The consensus of a landslide election from his peers in the House of Bishops gives a special opening for mapping out a new path forward and we have already seen the response from people in and beyond the church who have gotten to know him: a rare combination of evangelical zeal and commitment to equity and justice wrapped in a compassionate touch that is authentic to his core, wishing every blessing on this day of investiture! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME November 1, 2015 at 2:30 pm I am overjoyed!!! I’ve been a part of this church for almost 40 years and never have I seen the likes of this!!! An Evangelical Presiding Born-Again Bishop!!!!!!!!!!!!! We have hope today to “GO” and tell it from the mountains that Jesus Christ Reigns!!!! Come close world! This is all for each and every one! Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Comments (5) Peter Lafford says: Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Thom Chu says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA November 1, 2015 at 9:06 am We are so blessed in Bishop Curry! I didn’t think I could be happier for the Episcopal Church than when Bishop J-S was installed, but it’s glory to glory. I prophesy here and now that Bishops Michael and Francis will get along like tinder and spark, and the world will glow with the light of the Spirit flowing through them. Hallelujah, for All the Saints! Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR October 30, 2015 at 4:37 pm I am excited to be on my way to Washington to attend the Installation with my sister and brother. Bishop Curry was a student of my father’s, Lindsay Lafford, Professor of Music and Organist at Hobart College. To honor that connection, Bishop Curry asked that some of my father’s music be included in the Organ Prelude. We are humbled by the request, which also honors my father’s legacy to the Episcopal and Anglican church, in which he was active from the age of nine as a chorister, then organ scholar, at Hereford Cathedral, England, followed by four years as Organist at St. John’s Cathedral, Hong Kong, from 1935-39, before coming to America for a long academic career. He continued to compose and play for services up until his death in 2014 at the age of 101 1/2, in Tempe, Arizona. More on his history and music is on his website, http://Lord-of-Ridley.com. Peach McDouall says: Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 30, 2015 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curry Installation, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Michael Curry, shown here peaching in July 2014 at the Episcopal Youth Event in Philadelphia, will be installed Nov. 1 as The Episcopal Church’s 27th presiding bishop and its primate in a historic celebration at Washington National Cathedral. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church will make history Nov. 1 as it celebrates the All Saints Sunday installation of Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry as its 27th presiding bishop and its primate.On that day, Curry, 62, will become the first person of color to hold the position of presiding bishop and primate. The Holy Eucharist with the installation begins at noon EST (daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. Nov. 1) at Washington National Cathedral. Curry will preach and celebrate the Eucharist.The service will be webcast live and be available at three different locations:The cathedral’s website with English and Spanish versions;This page on the cathedral’s YouTube channel; andThe General Convention Office’s website.The live webcast will be closed-captioned for the hearing-impaired.After the service, on-demand video viewing of the Eucharist will be available here.Episcopal, Anglican, ecumenical, and interreligious guests will join bishops, General Convention deputies, Executive Council members and other leaders, members and guests of The Episcopal Church for the celebration.At the beginning of the service, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, along with House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings and others, will welcome Curry at the door and participate with him in the early part of the service, which includes questions to him, renewal of the baptismal covenant, Curry’s seating in the cathedral (Washington National Cathedral has been the presiding bishop’s seat since 1941), the handing over of the primatial staff and prayers for the new presiding bishop by representatives of the ecumenical and interreligious communities and the Anglican Communion. Later in the service the readings and the prayers of the people will be read in various languages.The order of service is available for downloading here.The day before the installation, the Union of Black Episcopalians will host a Vigil Celebration for Curry at 11 a.m. EDT at the D.C. Armory. The Rev. Canon Sandye Wilson, who will preach at the service, has said the service will be a time to be with Curry and pray with him.Jefferts Schori will preside at the Eucharist and Curry will celebrate.There is no charge to attend the vigil and tickets are not necessary; however registration is requested to provide for ample programs, seats, etc. Registration is available here.The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society will sponsor a live webcast of the vigil celebration here.Elected at General ConventionThe House of Bishops elected Curry June 27 during General Convention on the first ballot. It was a landslide; he received 121 votes of a total 174 cast. The number of votes needed for election was 89. It was the first time the bishops had elected a presiding bishop on the first ballot.Diocese of Southwest Florida Bishop Dabney Smith, Diocese of Southern Ohio Bishop Thomas Breidenthal and Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas were the other nominees.Curry’s election was confirmed an hour later by the House of Deputies, as outlined in the church’s canons, by a vote of 800 to 12.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, shown here speaking at the Diocese of Newark clergy conference Oct. 26, will complete her nine-term in office at the end of the day Oct. 31. Photo: Cynthia L. BlackThis makes the second time in a row that the church will make history with its installation of a presiding bishop. In 2006, current Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori became the first woman elected presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church. She was also the first female among the primates, or ordained leaders, of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, a distinction she still holds. Jefferts Schori had been elected June 18, 2006 during the 75th meeting of General Convention.The roles of the presiding bishopThe presiding bishop is chief pastor and primate of the church, chair of the Executive Council, and president of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. The canonical outline of the presiding bishop’s election and term can be found in Title I Section 2 of the church’s Canons.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)According to Title I Section 2, the presiding bishop as chief pastor and primate is “charged with responsibility for leadership in initiating and developing the policy and strategy in the church and speaking for the church as to the policies, strategies and programs authorized by the General Convention.”The presiding bishop also “speaks God’s word to the church and world as the representative of this church and its episcopate in its corporate capacity,” represents The Episcopal Church to the Anglican Communion, serves as chief consecrator of bishops, and leads the House of Bishops. He or she also holds a significant role in the discipline and changes in status of bishops, according to Title I Section 2.Also, the presiding bishop exercises a significant role in the governance of the church by making appointments to various governing bodies, making decisions with the president of the House of Deputies, serving as a member of every churchwide committee and commission, and serving as chair and president of key church governing boards. He or she is the chair and chief executive officer of the Executive Council, which is the board of directors for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, according to Canon I.4, and oversees the execution of the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention and carried out by the society.The staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society report to the presiding bishop, who is the society’s president, either directly or through a group of senior staff and officers who, according to canon, report and are accountable directly to the presiding bishop. (The office of the General Convention, by canon, maintains a separate reporting structure.)Washington National Cathedral in northwest Washington, D.C., will be the site of the Nov. 1 installation of Bishop Michael Curry as The Episcopal Church’s 27th presiding bishop and its primate. Photo: Washington National CathedralIn its “Call to Discernment and Profile”, the joint nominating committee said the 27th presiding bishop would need to be “comfortable in the midst of ambiguity and able to lead the church in the rich, temporal space between the ‘now,’ and the ‘yet to come.’ ” The person discerned and elected by the church would need to “delight” in the diversity of a “multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-generational church.” And, because “our polity has many components and complexities,” the 27th presiding bishop will need the “skills and wisdom for leading complex and democratic systems through a time of significant change.”Originally, the office of presiding bishop was filled automatically by the most senior bishop in the House of Bishops, measured by date of consecration, beginning with the presidency of William White at the first session of the 1789 General Convention. That process changed in 1925 when the church elected the Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray as the 16th presiding bishop.Presiding Bishop-elect Curry’s past ministryBorn in Chicago, Illinois, on March 13, 1953, Curry attended public schools in Buffalo, New York, and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Hobart and William Smith Colleges, in Geneva, New York, and a Master of Divinity degree in 1978 from the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale. He has also studied at the College for Preachers, Princeton Theological Seminary, Wake Forest University, the Ecumenical Institute at St. Mary’s Seminary, and the Institute of Christian Jewish Studies.He was ordained to the diaconate in June 1978 at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Buffalo, New York, and to the priesthood in December 1978 at St. Stephen’s, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He began his ministry as deacon-in-charge at St. Stephen’s, and was rector there 1979-1982. He next accepted a call to serve as the rector of St. Simon of Cyrene, Lincoln Heights, Ohio, where he served 1982-1988. In 1988, he became rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Maryland, where he served until his election as bishop in 2000.In his three parish ministries, Curry was active in the founding of ecumenical summer day camps for children, the creation of networks of family day-care providers and educational centers, and the brokering of millions of dollars of investment in inner city neighborhoods. He also sat on the commission on ministry in each of the three dioceses in which he has served.During his time as bishop of North Carolina, Curry instituted a network of canons, deacons and youth ministry professionals dedicated to supporting the ministry that already happens in local congregations and refocused the diocese on The Episcopal Church’s dedication to the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals through a $400,000 campaign to buy malaria nets that saved thousands of lives.Throughout his ministry, Curry has also been active in issues of social justice, speaking out on immigration policy and marriage equality.He serves on the boards of a large number of organizations and has a national preaching and teaching ministry. He has been featured on The Protestant Hour and North Carolina Public Radio’s The State of Things, as well as on The Huffington Post website. In addition, Curry is a frequent speaker at conferences around the country. He has received honorary degrees from Sewanee: The University of the South, Virginia Theological Seminary, Yale, and, most recently, Episcopal Divinity School. He served on the Taskforce for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church and is chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s board of directors.His most recent book, Songs My Grandma Sang, was published in June 2015. His book of sermons, Crazy Christians, came out in August 2013.Curry and his wife, Sharon, have two adult daughters, Rachel and Elizabeth.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem October 30, 2015 at 9:21 am A GREAT DAY FOR THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH !! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Christopher Epting says: Jane Kirk _ St. Stephen’s Mission, NH says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

Matthew Shepard to be interred at Washington National Cathedral after…

first_img Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Human Sexuality Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Matthew Shepard to be interred at Washington National Cathedral after public service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Matthew Shepard was active in his Episcopal congregation in Casper, Wyoming. Photo courtesy of Washington National Cathedral[Episcopal News Service] Twenty years after the brutal murder of gay college student Matthew Shepard sparked national outrage, his ashes will be interred at Washington National Cathedral following a public service of remembrance.The Service of Thanksgiving and Remembrance for Matthew Shepard on Oct. 26 will be led by Washington Bishop Marian Budde and retired New Hampshire Bishop Gene Robinson, the Episcopal Church’s first openly gay bishop and an acquaintance of the Shepard family. Until now, Shepard’s parents had not settled on a final resting place for his remains out of concern the site would be vandalized. As they approached 20 years since their son’s death, Robinson helped the family make arrangements at Washington National Cathedral.The tragedy of Shepard’s death is still a call to the nation to reject bigotry and “instead embrace each of our neighbors for who they are,” the Very Rev. Randy Hollerith, dean of the cathedral, said in a news release. “The Shepard family has shown extraordinary courage and grace in keeping his spirit and memory alive, and the cathedral is honored and humbled to serve as his final resting place.”Shepard, 21, was a student at the University of Wyoming in Laramie when a passerby found him beaten and tied to a fence in October 1998. He died later at a hospital. The crime ignited an outcry against the prevalence of anti-gay violence.His 1998 funeral was held at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Casper, Wyoming, the congregation where he had served as an acolyte. Shepard also had attended the Canterbury Club while at college.“Matt loved the Episcopal Church and felt welcomed by his church in Wyoming,” his mother, Judy Shepard, said in a cathedral news release. “For the past 20 years, we have shared Matt’s story with the world. It’s reassuring to know he now will rest in a sacred spot where folks can come to reflect on creating a safer, kinder world.”About 200 people are interred at Washington National Cathedral, including President Woodrow Wilson and Helen Keller. Shepard’s interment will be a private ceremony, but the service of remembrance will be open to the public and could draw a capacity crowd of 1,500 to 2,000 people, the cathedral’s chief communications officer, Kevin Eckstrom, told Episcopal News Service.The site may become something of a pilgrimage stop within the LGBTQ community, Eckstrom said. And Budde, quoted in the New York Times, underscored that the Episcopal Church is striving to offer a message of welcome to all people.“A lot has changed [since Shepard’s killing], but not everything has changed,” Budde told the Times. “It felt really important for us to say that we believe LGBTQ people are beloved children of God, not in spite of their identities but because of who they are – who God created them to be.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By David PaulsenPosted Oct 11, 2018 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

Benefit concert to support Episcopal work with indigenous communities

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA By David PaulsenPosted May 14, 2020 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Food and Faith, Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Health & Healthcare, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Church’s grassroots efforts help Navajoland feed families impacted by COVID-19 outbreak Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI “This week was a busy week,” GJ Gordy, who serves Navajoland as a communications specialist, said May 8 in a Facebook post about the food distribution. “We got back to Farmington with 5 minutes to spare before the Navajo Nation curfew started at 8 p.m.” Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Bailey said Navajoland has received enough money to make additional food purchases, and it is working with tribal authorities to ensure they aren’t duplicating efforts. Navajoland also is thinking ahead to the fall and winter and may use some of the money to purchase in advance some of the coal and wood that residents will need to heat their homes.The June 11 fundraising concert will allow the Diocese of Northern Michigan to continue to support those efforts, though it will broaden the scope. The Episcopal Church’s Indigenous Ministries Advisory Council will help Northern Michigan identify recipients among all indigenous communities served by The Episcopal Church based on their needs.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Since last week’s food deliveries, volunteers have ventured through the region to distribute the food to families living in the communities around Navajoland’s 11 congregations. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Rev. Cornelia Eaton poses for a photo May 5 with volunteers as they sort food for distribution to communities near Navajoland churches. Photo: Cornelia Eaton, via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] An outpouring of support from around the country has enabled the Episcopal Church in Navajoland to deliver emergency food and supplies to more than 100 families on the Navajo Nation reservation, which has one of the highest concentrations of COVID-19 cases in the United States.The Navajo Nation tribal government reported this week that 119 people have died after contracting the coronavirus, and the Navajo Nation’s number of confirmed cases has grown to about 3,400. That reportedly places the reservation’s per capita rate of infection higher than that of any state, though worse outbreaks have been identified in some U.S. cities and counties.About 175,000 people live on the reservation, which covers more than 27,000 square miles in the Four Corners region of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. More than 30% of households lack running water, and many residents live below the poverty line in isolated villages far from the nearest grocery store. Tribal curfews intended to slow the coronavirus’ spread have made it even more difficult for families to access food and clean water.“The need has always been there. … The pandemic has just exacerbated the problem,” Navajoland Bishop David Bailey said in a phone interview with Episcopal News Service.Navajoland’s clergy and lay leaders got a big boost to their feeding ministries from a national fundraising effort launched by the Diocese of Northern Michigan, which raised $40,000. A diverse group of church leaders and businesses nationwide offered logistical and delivery assistance, and volunteers in recent days have traveled village to village to distribute the food.Northern Michigan also is organizing an online benefit concert June 11, called Indigi-Aid, to raise money to support indigenous ministries across The Episcopal Church during the pandemic. The diocese is lining up musicians, dancers, storytellers and other artists and performers for the four-hour event, to be structured like an old-fashioned telethon.“It kind of was just this grassroots, scrappy idea that has grown into to something that people feel excited about,” the Rev. Lydia Kelsey Bucklin, Northern Michigan’s canon to the ordinary for discipleship and vitality, told ENS.Indigenous communities are particularly vulnerable to coronavirus outbreaks due to a range of factors, including high poverty rates, frequent underlying health conditions and limited access to clean water for handwashing. And although population density is low across the Navajo reservation, extended families typical live close together in villages, sometimes with several people in one house, making it difficult to practice the physical distancing that is one of the most effective ways of slowing transmission of the virus.Tribal governments and councils have issued lockdown orders on reservations in the U.S. mainland and in isolated villages home to Alaska Natives to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Those measures sometimes have run counter to state policies, notably in South Dakota, where Gov. Kristi Noem has objected to two tribes’ precautionary checkpoints on state and U.S. highways. So far, no coronavirus outbreaks have been reported on those two reservations, Pine Ridge and Cheyenne River – a marked contrast to the ongoing crisis on the Navajo reservation.A large church gathering on March 7 in Chilchinbeto, Arizona, is suspected of partly fueling the Navajo Nation outbreak. In their attempt to slow the spread of the virus, tribal leaders declared a state of emergency on March 13 and have implemented overnight and weekend curfews restricting travel.“With some states starting to reopen, it’s giving people the impression that it’s okay to go out into public, but it’s not safe yet,” Navajo President Jonathan Nez said in a May 13 news release. “With today’s numbers, it’s clear that everyone needs to step up and hold each other accountable to stay home.”In 1978, The Episcopal Church carved out sections of the dioceses of Rio Grande, Arizona and Utah to create the Navajoland Area Mission, an effort toward unification of language, culture and families. The churchwide triennial budget now includes a $1 million block grant to support Navajoland. In recent years, the church’s Development Office also has worked with Navajoland leaders to strengthen their local fundraising efforts.The Diocese of Northern Michigan is active in indigenous ministries as well. Of the 12 federally recognized Native American tribes based in Michigan, five are in the state’s sparsely populated Upper Peninsula. Bishop Rayford Ray, Bucklin and other diocesan officials keep in contact with their counterparts in other dioceses through a loose network of indigenous clergy and other ministry leaders serving American Indian communities.In late March, they started sharing their experiences weekly via video conference calls organized by the Rev. Bradley Hauff, The Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries. Much of the ensuing conversations focused on the worsening COVID-19 crisis on the Navajo reservation.By mid-April, those conversations grew into a fundraising campaign based in Northern Michigan but extending across the country, with the initial goal of $40,000. The diocese began promoting the campaign on Facebook on April 16, and the homepage of the diocesan website displayed a call for donations.The campaign received key support from several bishops who were consecrated within a year of Bailey and Ray in 2010 and 2011, including Wyoming Bishop John Smylie, Alaska Bishop Mark Lattime and Utah Bishop Scott Hayashi. Through calls for matching donations from Episcopalians across the church and through direct online donations to Navajoland, the campaign quickly met its goal.“That’s just one tiny diocese helping another tiny diocese,” Bucklin said. “We felt it’s something we can do, some small thing we can do.”That small campaign paid off in a big way this month, as efforts to support Navajoland continue to gain momentum in unexpected ways. An individual in Austin, Texas, donated a freezer to store food until it could be distributed. And in the Diocese of the Rio Grande, which includes New Mexico, Bishop Michael Hunn told ENS he was all set to buy food, load it into his pickup truck and drive it from Albuquerque to Navajoland headquarters in Farmington, but a better option materialized.Rio Grande’s Bosque Conference and Retreat Center was closed because of the pandemic, but its head chef, Jerry Gallegos, told Hunn the center still had an open account with food wholesaler Sysco. Instead of deploying his pickup, Hunn suggested that Bailey work with Gallegos to put in an order for food from Sysco, which made its first delivery – in its own truck – on May 5.Spirits were high as Facebook posts from Navajoland leaders showed the food being unloaded at All Saints Episcopal Church in Farmington, New Mexico.“Thank you all for your support and prayers for helping us to serve the Diné as ‘beloved community,’” the Rev. Cornelia Eaton, Navajoland canon to the ordinary for ministry, said on Facebook.Then on May 6, another truck arrived, this time with food and supplies donated by Giving Children Hope, a nonprofit based in Buena Park, California, a Los Angeles suburb.The key connection behind that donation was the Rev. Mary Crist, The Episcopal Church’s coordinator for indigenous theological education, who is based in Southern California. Crist knew the nonprofit’s director, and when she explained Navajoland’s efforts, Giving Children Hope was happy to help. Its website also prominently features a call for additional money for Navajoland. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Indigenous Ministries Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET COVID-19, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Eventslast_img read more

Radio Jowhar resumes broadcasting, but without music

first_img Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent Sudan : Press freedom still in transition a year after Omar al-Bashir’s removal SudanAfrica News Receive email alerts Organisation SudanAfrica April 6, 2020 Find out more News RSF_en to go furthercenter_img Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Sudan Privately-owned Radio Jowhar resumed broadcasting at midday yesterday after spending 27 hours without electricity as a result of a decision by the Islamic courts. But now all kinds of music from nationalist tunes to love songs are banned, except jingles lasting no more than a minute, Reporters Without Borders has learned from Omar Faruk Osman, the secretary-general of its partner organisation, the National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ).——————————11.09.06 – Radio station closed down and reporter arrested at behest of Islamic courtsReporters Without Borders today condemned punitive measures taken by Somalia’s Islamic courts against the press in the past few days, including the closure of the privately-owned Radio Jowhar and the arbitrary detention for 48 hours of Osman Adan Areys, a journalist based in the central city of Beledweyn.“It is painful to see that, for the Somali population, anarchy is gradually being replaced by oppression,” the press freedom organisation said. “It is not too late for the Islamic tribunals to realise that maintaining order is not a matter of imposing prohibitions and a reign of fear.”Reporters Without Borders added: “Radio Jowhar’s attempts to maintain an independent editorial line in the terrible climate prevailing in Somalia deserves to be rewarded with respect, not with arbitrary closure. Similarly, journalists should not have to live in fear of being arrested by militiamen just because the facts they have reported have upset someone in authority.”The regional government of Middle Shabelle, which is backed by the Islamic courts in Mogadishu, ordered the privately-owned Jowhar-based Radio Jowhar to stop broadcasting music and songs on 9 September. Agence France-Presse quoted a commander in the Supreme Islamic Council of Somalia (SICS) as saying the aim was to stop the broadcasting of “music that promotes devilish behaviour.” An Islamic court official quoted by the Associated Press said: “It is useless to air music and love songs for the people.”After receiving the order, Radio Jowhar’s management tried to argue that it was essential for the station to continue broadcasting music. An SICS armed unit then went to the station and stopped all further broadcasting. Jowhar’s power company has also been ordered not to supply the station with any more electricity, according to Reporters Without Borders’ partner organisation, the National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ).Founded by intellectuals from different clans, Radio Jowhar is Jowhar’s only privately-owned radio station. It has tried to remain editorially independent at a time when many other stations are taking sides with the different political forces fighting for power.Meanwhile, a militia that supports the Islamic courts arrested Areys, a local correspondent for privately-owned Radio Simba and other Mogadishu-based stations, on 8 September in Beledweyn, the capital of the central region of Hiiraan, while he was covering a demonstration after Friday evening prayers in protest against any deployment of peacekeepers in Somalia.Beledweyn-based journalists quoted by NUSOJ said Areys was arrested because of a radio report in which members of the city’s population complained about the restrictions being imposed by the Islamic courts. He was released yesterday without any charges being pressed. September 12, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio Jowhar resumes broadcasting, but without music News Coronavirus infects press freedom in Africa April 10, 2020 Find out more News March 29, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Radio station resumes broadcasting in central city

first_img News to go further The main privately-owned radio station in the central city of Agadez, Sahara FM, was back on the air yesterday for the first time since it was shut down two years ago. It was able to resume broadcasting after obtaining a permit from the National Institute for Communication (ONC), the media’s new regulatory authority.The station was closed “for an indefinite period” on 22 April 2008 by the Higher Council for Communication (CSC), the previous regulatory authority, after being accused by then President Mamadou Tandja’s government of being “a dangerous radio station broadcasting calls for ethnic hatred.” “We welcome this development, which allows Niger to recover a truly independent news outlet,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The reopening of this radio station has come at a time when the country’s media are enjoying more and more freedom. The climate for the press has improved significantly since President Tandja’s removal last February.”The press freedom organisation added: “The national media conference held at the end of March led to the adoption of a law decriminalising press offences at the start of June.”——————————————————————————————-04.22.2010 – Agadez-based radio station closed for reporting abuses by soldiers in northToday’s decision by the Higher Council for Communication (CSC) to close privately-owned radio Sahara FM, the main radio station in the northern city of Agadez, is an authoritarian blunder that will just aggravate the situation in Niger’s strife-ridden northern region, Reporters Without Borders said.“A jittery government is adopting increasingly repressive measures that are counter-productive,” the press freedom organisation said. “This decision is dangerous as it deprives the public of an independent news source in the country’s most troubled region. Without it, rumour and confusion will hold sway. We respect the people of Niger and we therefore think that in a time of crisis they have right to complete and diversified news coverage.”The CSC, which is in charge of regulating Niger’s media, announced Sahara FM’s closure today after the station broadcast interviews with people who had been the victims of abuses by government soldiers. The CSC said it was closing it down for an “indefinite” period and “without prejudice to the possibility of criminal prosecutions.”Sahara FM director Raliou Hamed-Assaleh was summoned to the capital Niamey on 18 April after the governor and police chief of Agadez accused the station of broadcasting “dangerous” statements by local inhabitants that “appeal to ethnic hate and undermine army morale.”“All we did was broadcast an account of something that happened,” Hamed-Assaleh told Reporters Without Borders.A report issued by Amnesty International on 3 April described a “new wave of extrajudicial executions” and “forced disappearances” by the army in the Agadez region.Moussa Kaka, the director of Niamey-based Radio Saraounia and the Niger correspondent of both Radio France Internationale and Reporters Without Borders, has been held since 20 September for being in phone contact with Tuareg rebels operating in the north. He has been charged with “complicity in an attack on state authority.”Ibrahim Manzo Diallo, the editor of the Agadez-based fortnightly Aïr Info, was arrested for similar reasons on 20 October. He was released on 6 February. Receive email alerts July 16, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Niger May 11, 2021 Find out more News NigerAfrica Niger: Two journalists arrested in disturbing setback for press freedom Organisation center_img Help by sharing this information The conviction of Niger newspaper editor Moussa Aksar is an attack on investigative journalism NigerAfrica June 15, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio station resumes broadcasting in central city The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa November 27, 2020 Find out more Reports News RSF_en last_img read more

Pasadena Yoga Instructor Convicted of Sexual Battery

first_img Pasadena City Attorney/City Prosecutor Michele Beal Bagneris today announced the successful conviction of a local yoga instructor on four counts of sexual battery.A Los Angeles County Superior Court jury in Pasadena on Nov. 13, 2013 found Naader Shagagi, 56, a yoga instructor and owner of Yoga Kingdom Sanctuary, 553 S. Lake Ave., guilty of four counts of sexual battery by fraudulent representation. Sentencing is set for Dec. 5, 2013 in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Pasadena, Department O. The defendant’s conviction requires a lifetime registration as a sex offender.“We are grateful that the jury has sent a strong message that sex crimes will not be tolerated,” Pasadena City Attorney/City Prosecutor Michele Beal Bagneris said. If other victims step forward, our office will pursue these matters and seek justice for the victims.”Mr. Shagagi was convicted of committing the sexual crimes at his Lake Avenue yoga studio. He was convicted under California Penal Code section 243.4(c). The jury could not reach a unanimous verdict on two other sexual battery charges.The case was based on complaints from three young female yoga students who were assaulted by Shagagi during so-called private “healing” sessions. Evidence provided by Deputy City Prosecutor Joon Kim showed the victims were told that his intimate touching would help “heal” the victims.Other fraudulent representations that the defendant made to the victims included that he was a “healer” who had cured others of breast cancer and that he was a “messenger of gods” who could communicate with gods.One of Yoga Kingdom Sanctuary’s brochures advertised “Curative Yoga” that could cure “any ailments.” The victims were convinced to participate in multiple private “healing” sessions with Shagagi during which he repeatedly groped and touched them.Bagneris said victims of sex crimes need to know “they are not alone and that the police and prosecutors are here to help them.” Bagneris said sex predators often groom their victims, developing a relationship of trust and confidence, and then breach that trust to satisfy their unlawful sexual behaviors.Bagneris encourages any sexual assault victim to contact the Pasadena Police Department at (626) 744-4241.For more information about the City of Pasadena visit www.cityofpasadena.net or follow us on [email protected] Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it HerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenacenter_img Subscribe News Feature Stories Pasadena Yoga Instructor Convicted of Sexual Battery Published on Thursday, November 14, 2013 | 2:26 pm Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News last_img read more

School of Looking exhibition on display in Mary Immaculate College

first_imgLimerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Air Limerick Post Show | Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste Twitter Previous articleState need to speed up delivery of social housing says Limerick TDNext articleFood poverty is this Government’s inconvenient truth says Limerick TD Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Facebook NewsEducationSchool of Looking exhibition on display in Mary Immaculate CollegeBy Staff Reporter – April 19, 2018 2021 TAGSAnne ClearyDenis ConnollyDounoughmoreMary Immaculate CollegeSchool of Lookingstudentsvisual art Email WhatsApp Printcenter_img Week-long Celebration of Women as MIC Marks International Women’s Day Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland Megan Aherne pictured at Mary Immaculate Collage for The School of looking project.Picture: Brian ArthurAn exhibition, currently on display at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, shows how much fun art and science are, and that these two important disciplines are not exclusive but are two sides of the same creative coin.The School of Looking project had its origins from artists Anne Cleary and Denis Connolly whose practice focuses on visual perception. The artists and 3rd year B Ed (Primary Teaching) students at Mary Immaculate College worked closely with sixth class pupils from Dounoughmore School, Limerick, exploring the theme of the art of perception. This involved research into vision, investigation and simulations of the optical systems around animal and human vision using prisms and lenses, design of form, and exploration of innovative materials.The MIC student’s initial concepts and explorations focused on ideas produced by the children.  The children’s research, understanding and investigations of animal vision became the motivation of the student’s artworks.  The four interactive prototype helmets produced and on display within the exhibition are a combination of artists, students and children’s ideas coming together to solve a particular problem, in this case how to design and construct an optical device to demonstrate how a bee, jumping spider and a fly can see!Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Megan Aherne pictured at Mary Immaculate Collage for The School of looking projectPicture: Brian ArthurAccording to Anne Marie Morrin, Visual Art Lecturer, MIC; the School of Looking Project is multidisciplinary in nature and encourages both local school-children and MIC students to explore their own creativity through the challenges set by the project.  “The exploration of the theme provided opportunities for research, problem solving, experiential and practical learning in and through Visual Art, Biology and Physics demonstrating the importance of developing children’s creative and imaginative potential in Visual Art and STEM education” she said.Also speaking on the merits of this novel project was Anne Cleary, of Cleary and Connolly who said: “This is an innovative and inclusive way of teaching, one that benefited both the student teachers and the pupils at Dounoughmore School significantly. Through the process they learned about the physics, the chemistry, and the biology of vision. They developed design, handcraft and communication skills, in addition to learning about the value of methodical research, and how to interpret and translate that research into an accessible design. They learned to work as a team, to listen to and respect each other’s ideas.”The School of Looking exhibition is currently on display in the Art Studios, Mary Immaculate College, until 31 May.More about education here. Linkedin Advertisement MIC Societies scoop four Board of Irish College Societies national awardslast_img read more

Bombay HC Rejects Anticipatory Bail To Man Who Assaulted Cop & Violated Lockdown Orders [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesBombay HC Rejects Anticipatory Bail To Man Who Assaulted Cop & Violated Lockdown Orders [Read Order] Nitish Kashyap26 Oct 2020 8:25 AMShare This – xThe Bombay High Court last Wednesday rejected an anticipatory bail application filed by a father and son duo who were accused of beating up a policeman who asked them to close down their shop in June at around 11 pm at night. Court observed that assault on a public servant on duty cannot be tolerated.Justice SV Kotwal was hearing the anticipatory bail application filed by Khwaja Qureshi…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Bombay High Court last Wednesday rejected an anticipatory bail application filed by a father and son duo who were accused of beating up a policeman who asked them to close down their shop in June at around 11 pm at night. Court observed that assault on a public servant on duty cannot be tolerated.Justice SV Kotwal was hearing the anticipatory bail application filed by Khwaja Qureshi and Malang Qureshi who were booked for offences under Sections 353, 332, 188, 269, 270, 504, 506 read with Section 34 of the Indian Penal Code. According to the prosecution, the FIR was lodged by Police Constable Dinkar Lilake. He has stated that at the relevant time, the Police Commissioner, Mumbai had imposed lockdown orders. On June 2, 2020 at about 10:45 pm, the first informant and others remained present on their duty. He was accompanied by Police Constable Padawi. While they were patrolling in the jurisdiction of Goregaon police station, it was observed that in a room at Samata-Mitha Nagar Co.operative Housing Society, Mitha Nagar, Goregaon (West), grocery articles were being sold from residential premises. The informant went there and asked the owner to close the shop. At that time, the Applicant Khwaja was not wearing a mask. He was asked to wear a mask. Khwaja refused to wear the mask and refused to close the shop; and instead, abused the first informant. Khwaja pushed the first informant, snatched the wooden stick, which the informant was carrying and assaulted the informant himself. At that time, the other Applicant Malang, who is father of the Applicant Khwaja, abused him and beat him as well. The information was given to PI Jadhav. He came there. By that time, both the accused had left the place and thereafter this FIR was lodged. Applicant’s counsel Advocate Vijendra Kumar Rai submitted that the CCTV footage of the incident is available and none of the applicants is seen assaulting the informant. He emphatically submitted that Khwaja was not present at the spot and he is not seen in the CCTV footage. He submitted that a third person who was unknown to the applicants assaulted the first informant. Moreover, applicant Malang came subsequently and he was trying to disperse the mob and he was in fact helping the first informant. There was no shop and the allegations show that the grocery articles were sold from the residential premises. The CCTV footage does not show that anybody was buying the articles and Khwaja was not present at the spot and neither has Malang assaulted the first informant. The statements of alleged eye witnesses are manipulated and they have not seen the incident, Rai argued.On the other hand, APP Rutuja Ambekar relied on the affidavit filed by the Investigating Officer, which mentions that there are two independent eye witnesses, namely, Master Gaurav Anand Sawant and Usman Ismail Beg. Both of them narrated about the assault made by the applicants. The CCTV footage was shown to one of the residents, namely, Tushar Satam. He identified both the Applicants in the CCTV footage. APP Ambekar submitted that the offence is serious and such acts have to be discouraged and should not be condoned. Considering the gravity of the offence and the assault mounted on a Public Servant carrying out his duty should be dealt with sternly, she contended.Court observed-“I have considered all these submissions. From the affidavit filed by the Investigating Officer, it can be seen that there are independent eye witnesses to the incident and they have identified both the accused as the assailants. The CCTV footage was shown to the witness Tushar Satam. He has also identified both the Applicants. Therefore, at this stage, the submission of the learned Counsel for the Applicant cannot be taken into account that the Applicant Khwaja was not present at the spot when the incident occurred. The offence is serious. A Public Servant carrying out his duty in the interest of society was assaulted and this fact cannot be tolerated. Therefore, Applicant Khwaja does not deserve any protection considering the gravity of the offence.”However, considering the much lesser role attributed to the Applicant Malang and also considering his advanced age of 70 years, Court was inclined to grant protection only to him. Thus, the application filed by Khwaja Qureshi was rejected. Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Get ready to ‘Scale Back’ in 2009

first_img Book Nook to reopen Skip Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Get ready to ‘Scale Back’ in 2009 Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… The weigh-in for local teams will be from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Jan. 12, from 9 a.m. until noon on Jan. 13 and 14 and from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Jan. 15. There will be no weigh-ins on Friday.All weigh-ins will be at the Charles Henderson Health Center.“We encourage everyone who needs or wants to lose at least 10 pounds over the next few weeks to form a team, choose a team name, designate a team captain and come weigh in,” Hill said. “Last year’s Scale Back Alabama program was very successful here in Troy and Pike County.We had more than 380 participants who lost a total of 2,000 pounds. You Might Like Not too late for flu vaccine The best way to prevent getting the flu is to receive a flu vaccination. And, the good news for those… read more Print Article Email the author The 2009 Scale Back Alabama program will be directed locally by Steps to a Healthier AL and the Charles Henderson Child Health Care Center.“Scale Back Alabama” is a 10-week weight loss program with a team concept, said Christi Hill, Pike County Steps to a Healthier AL project director.“Most people do better with their weight-loss programs if they are accountable to someone,” Hill said. “Participants in the Scale Back Alabama weight loss program are on teams of four. Each team has a captain who is the motivator and cheerleader for the team. The captain receives emails with valuable weight-loss information and passes them on to his or her teammates. Each teammate supports the other, making it easier to eat healthier, exercise more and lose those pounds.” Latest Stories The greatest “resolve” of the New Year will be to lose weight.The resolution most often broken is … to lose weight.To help those whose resolution is to lose weight, the Scale Back Alabama “challenge” offers the opportunity to win big bucks to the big losers. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Jaine Treadwell Published 3:17 pm Thursday, January 1, 2009 Sponsored Content Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Statewide the program was also very successful and we expect it to be just as successful this year.”Losing 10 pounds is not the program’s only incentive. There’s also money to be won.“For every team member who completes the contest and loses at least 10 pounds, his or her name will be placed in a drawing for one of 50 state prizes of $100 each,” Hill said.“For every team member who completes the 10-week period, with each team member losing at least 10 pounds, the team’s name will be placed in a drawing for one of three grand prizes.”The first team drawn will win $250 per team member. The second team drawn will win $500 each and the third team drawn will win $1,000 each.“The chance for the prize money alone is worth the effort of losing 10 pounds,” Hill said.“We would love to have even more participants than last year. Scale Back Alabama is a good incentive to lose those extra pounds. It’s fun to be a part of a team and it’s smart to begin a healthier lifestyle in the New Year.” By The Penny Hoarder Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Daylast_img read more